Quantcast

enclosing chest freezer?

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

BuzzCraft

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2009
Messages
426
Reaction score
1
Location
Blacksburg, VA
Hi. I've read that some chest freezers can be enclosed (in wood), whereas others should not be enclosed due to the manner in which they dissipate heat, in which case you will kill the condenser in short order.

Does anyone have any tips on telling one type from the other?
 

Spunkmeyer

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Mar 17, 2008
Messages
143
Reaction score
0
If the instruction manual or appliance has recommended clearances to the rear, front, sides, etc., that's usually a good indicator you should tread very carefully.
 

david_42

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2005
Messages
25,584
Reaction score
179
Location
Oak Grove
If there isn't a plate of tubing with fins on the back, the condenser is probably built into the outside skin of the unit. If you can plug it in, just feel the outside while it is running.
 
OP
B

BuzzCraft

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2009
Messages
426
Reaction score
1
Location
Blacksburg, VA
Thanks for the replies. I haven't actually bought a freezer yet, but was hoping to enclose it with a cabinet to that SWMBO will be happier with it in the living space. Otherwise, I can see it being relegated to the unfinished basement. As I plan on spending most of my time beside the keezer, I'd rather it be in a comfortable location! :cross:

Thanks for the tips.
 

pen25

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Messages
972
Reaction score
3
Location
tulsa, ok
all can be enclosed. just make sure you have airflow. when building ensure you have about 2" from the bottom and 2 inchs from the top to allow air flow on the corners. id use 2x4's as the spacer. then you can use some muffin fans to pull the heat to the back up and out. also make sure you have enough opening to allow cold air to enter from the bottom. ill try to sketch something up if someone doesnt already have something sketched up.

i know i know its not all that great but i hope it helps

 

RBChallenger

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2009
Messages
95
Reaction score
0
Location
Tucson, AZ
My freezer that I am getting ready to enclose is the type that breath through the skin. I plan to leave 2" of space between the decorative wood enclosure and the skin. I also plan to leave the bottom completely open and about 2-3" (the height of the casters) off of the ground. The only exception on the bottom will be a single 2"x4" strip running through the center for strength. The back of mine will be completely open as well.

Like you, I have seriously been considering whether or not I need a fan(s) to move air around or if the 2" gap and passive cooling will be adequete. I am seriously leaning towards passive cooling at the moment. If I do go with the active (fan based) cooling it will just be a couple of muffine fans on the outside to draw cool air up through the bottom. Since it seems I am in the same boat as the OP, what are your opinions on leaving the back open and leaving the gap with no fan based air and the open bottom?
 

pen25

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Messages
972
Reaction score
3
Location
tulsa, ok
My freezer that I am getting ready to enclose is the type that breath through the skin. I plan to leave 2" of space between the decorative wood enclosure and the skin. I also plan to leave the bottom completely open and about 2-3" (the height of the casters) off of the ground. The only exception on the bottom will be a single 2"x4" strip running through the center for strength. The back of mine will be completely open as well.

Like you, I have seriously been considering whether or not I need a fan(s) to move air around or if the 2" gap and passive cooling will be adequete. I am seriously leaning towards passive cooling at the moment. If I do go with the active (fan based) cooling it will just be a couple of muffine fans on the outside to draw cool air up through the bottom. Since it seems I am in the same boat as the OP, what are your opinions on leaving the back open and leaving the gap with no fan based air and the open bottom?
if you leave the back open you really wont get a draw. think of a chimney. you want the heat to create air movement for great passive cooling. so what you want to try to do is match the air intakes to your exhaust. leaving the back open might work but if it doesnt shouldnt be hard to build the back to build some air movement. you can even use cardboard to simulate the back and figure out the best method.
 

RBChallenger

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2009
Messages
95
Reaction score
0
Location
Tucson, AZ
if you leave the back open you really wont get a draw. think of a chimney. you want the heat to create air movement for great passive cooling. so what you want to try to do is match the air intakes to your exhaust. leaving the back open might work but if it doesnt shouldnt be hard to build the back to build some air movement. you can even use cardboard to simulate the back and figure out the best method.
Thats a good point. I figure with the back open if I do go with a fan I can always use a push/pull muffin fan configuration to pull air, from the back through and around the front out the other side. The back will be enclosed in some nature since it will be butted up against a wall for all intensive purposes.

In my tiny little mind it seems that the freezers are in often times in a similar configuration out in garages. Often they are butted up in a corner with another item on the other side meaning the front side is really the only part exposed to more than a couple of inches of "fresh air". On top of that, here in AZ garages get VERY hot in the summer. True, I would also be incasing the top, but the top doesnt shed heat anyways to the best of my knowledge.
 

Latest posts

Top