electric set-up w/ decoction brewing

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mwill07

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I've been in the planning stages of putting together an e-HERMS set-up for a while now. I haven't pulled the trigger yet, waiting for some money to come in first.

Anyways, I think I want to start implementing decoctions in my brewing. Lots of the styles I'm most interested in could use decoctions to help with flavor development. I'm talking about Oktoberfest/marzen, dunkels, and bocks.

Are there any electric rigs out there that are set up to handle decoctions? What would such a rig look like?

the trick is heating the decoction. restricting to electric only, the way I see it there are three options:

  1. electric burner/hot plate
  2. RIMS
  3. e-kettle

on the the last two - I have concerns about allowing grains to contact the heating element directly, but I'm curious to see if this is workable.

Anyone have an elegant solution to handle deccoction brewing electrically?

Thanks
 

Pie_Man

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For the later two options, I would use a false bottom to keep the grains from directly contacting the heating element. In theory, this should work although I do not have an e-kettle, so I am not speaking from practice.
 

philipCT

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I had the same interest. While I was converting to electric, I added a separate propane burner at the end of the brewing line. I wanted it so I could easily extract from the mash for decoctions, prepare starters, and other things like sterilize jars, prepare bottling primer solutions. It turns out I use it all the time, so I'm very happy I did it. The burner has a cover that goes over it so I can use that flat surface for other things, like spinning up starters, when I'm not using the burner.

Here are some shots of the brew line.

20141110_132538.jpg


brewdayStarterCookingCU.jpg


brewdayStarterSpinning.jpg
 
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MaltedBayerl

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I had the same interest. While I was converting to electric, I added a separate propane burner at the end of the brewing line. I wanted it so I could easily extract from the mash for decoctions, prepare starters, and other things like sterilize jars, prepare bottling primer solutions. It turns out I use it all the time, so I'm very happy I did it. The burner has a cover that goes over it so I can use that flat surface for other things, like spinning up starters, when I'm not using the burner.

Here are some shots of the brew line.

I am going to think of your setup while I masturbate.
 
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mwill07

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I had the same interest. While I was converting to electric, I added a separate propane burner at the end of the brewing line. I wanted it so I could easily extract from the mash for decoctions, prepare starters, and other things like sterilize jars, prepare bottling primer solutions. It turns out I use it all the time, so I'm very happy I did it. The burner has a cover that goes over it so I can use that flat surface for other things, like spinning up starters, when I'm not using the burner.

Here are some shots of the brew line.

that looks great, gotta love beer porn.

Any reason you went propane instead of an electric burner?

I'm wondering if a good hot-plate could suit my needs.
 

philipCT

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I did propane because I found a single element form factor that fit in perfectly. In retrospect, I've thought that an induction plate would have been just as good but less expensive. I've never used one, but I bet it would do everything I need.
 

onthekeg

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Borosilicate glass is not rated for an open flame. Please be careful, hopefully it will just make a mess, but you can lift it off the burner and the bottom will stay there. They get stress fractures from the flame due to the huge differences in temp.
 

processhead

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Borosilicate glass is not rated for an open flame. Please be careful, hopefully it will just make a mess, but you can lift it off the burner and the bottom will stay there. They get stress fractures from the flame due to the huge differences in temp.

Really?
How is this glassware different than the stuff they use over an open flame in a gazillian laboratories around the world?

Sorry for the thread deflection.
 

onthekeg

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Really?
How is this glassware different than the stuff they use over an open flame in a gazillian laboratories around the world?

Sorry for the thread deflection.

It is the same. Kimax, Pyrex, same stuff, borosilicate. It is used on electric burners, not gas. If used with a flame it is a culture tube, not a flask. If used over a flame it is to be disposed after a few uses. US Pyrex isn't always borosilicate glass unless you buy it from a reputable supplier. Lots of low grade lab equipment and glassware out there these days. Much of it is soda lime, and will not handle being heated by a gas flame repeatedly. It is better on an electric stovetop as they heat gradually.

I am just saying, be aware of what can happen. I have been in the lab since 1987. Seen it happen many times.
 

philipCT

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It is the same. Kimax, Pyrex, same stuff, borosilicate. It is used on electric burners, not gas. If used with a flame it is a culture tube, not a flask. If used over a flame it is to be disposed after a few uses. US Pyrex isn't always borosilicate glass unless you buy it from a reputable supplier. Lots of low grade lab equipment and glassware out there these days. Much of it is soda lime, and will not handle being heated by a gas flame repeatedly. It is better on an electric stovetop as they heat gradually.

I am just saying, be aware of what can happen. I have been in the lab since 1987. Seen it happen many times.

Thanks a lot for this tip. Gotta love this board - always learning something new.

I had always thought this was okay for borosilicate. A real shame too, because it's really convenient to mix, boil, cool and pitch in the same container. Oh well, no biggie. I can cook in a small SS pot and transfer to flask after cooling.
 

Marquez

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Hey philipmeese!

Very nice brewing set up!

When are you going to post a tour?




I had the same interest. While I was converting to electric, I added a separate propane burner at the end of the brewing line. I wanted it so I could easily extract from the mash for decoctions, prepare starters, and other things like sterilize jars, prepare bottling primer solutions. It turns out I use it all the time, so I'm very happy I did it. The burner has a cover that goes over it so I can use that flat surface for other things, like spinning up starters, when I'm not using the burner.

Here are some shots of the brew line.
 

philipCT

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Hey philipmeese!

Very nice brewing set up!

When are you going to post a tour?

Thanks, Marquez.

I really should at this point. I was planning and building for eight months and when the day finally came to brew on the system I was so crazed with excitement and just went on a brewing binge for the next few months.

Now that I've calmed down I'll put all the photos together and post a build thread.
 
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