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Electric HLT thread.

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The Pol

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I could have, but Lowes didnt have it... so, I got a 50A... don't see a difference, but sure.
 

ajwillys

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It doesn't get much simpler than that, I guess

I guess that would be a heat stick .. easy to build ?

1500W - can the ranco handle that much ? (I know it can cause you are using it ..!)

I am curious what the limits for the ranco are ...
Yeah, its a heat stick. It was pretty easy to build. I used the directions found here: (scroll down)
How to Build an Electric Homebrewing Heatstick Audio Tutorial Podcast and Step by Step Photo Instructions

1500 watts is 12.5 amps at 120 volts and the Ranco is rated for 15 amps, so we're good.
 

Jonnio

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What are your guy's thoughts on the safety of a heatstick, vs. mounting a heating element directly into a sanke keg HLT?

I have decided to turn my keg into my HLT and it seems like electric is the way to go, but I am a little leery about leaks from cutting a hole in the bottom to stick an element through. Especially since I wouldn't go crazy with JB Weld or anything else that is permanent in case the element ever needed to be replaced.

At least with a heat stick you can encapsulate the electronics and just toss it when it needs to be replaced.
 

Brewmation

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Jonnio,

We use a 1" pipe thread lock nut and a gasket seal on our conversion kits. If you have a clean cut hole, you won't have to worry about leaks. Just be sure the gasket (flat washer seal) is located on the outside against the element flange. Otherwise, the liquid can find it's way along the threads and out... Also, be sure to use a seal that is soft and heavy enough to handle the curve of the keg.

In this link you can see the nut and seal pictured...

Home brewery electric conversion kits

Good luck!

Kevin
 

The Pol

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I didnt JB weld mine to my cooler... I dont know of anyone that has. If you have the proper nut, it shouldnt leak. Also, why not just pot the electrical connections on the element like I did, so they are impervious to water?
 

Jonnio

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That's probably a good idea Pol - did you use just make a form and fill it with some sort of epoxy?

With a cooler I wouldn't be too worried, but through a keg wall or floor it is a little less of a consistent surface to seal to.
 

maxbing

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POL,

I am thinking of converting my 10 Gal rubbermaid cooler to a Electric HLT like you did. Other than using a 2000w element what would you do different.

Do you have details of how you put the element in the cooler and sealed it from leaks. I am kind of nervous of drilling a big hole in my brand new cooler.
thanks

Scott
 

The Pol

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POL,

I am thinking of converting my 10 Gal rubbermaid cooler to a Electric HLT like you did. Other than using a 2000w element what would you do different.

Do you have details of how you put the element in the cooler and sealed it from leaks. I am kind of nervous of drilling a big hole in my brand new cooler.
thanks

Scott

I responded to your PM.
 

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gunner11

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Thanks for the reply and posting the other thread. I guess I am a little too novice electronically to attempt the heat stick build and do not want to have to install a 220V outlet. Really looking for something just to heat water to 175-180F and run on a standard household GFI outlet. I may just have to stick with propane.
 

Jawbox0

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Thanks for the reply and posting the other thread. I guess I am a little too novice electronically to attempt the heat stick build and do not want to have to install a 220V outlet. Really looking for something just to heat water to 175-180F and run on a standard household GFI outlet. I may just have to stick with propane.
Seriously, look at the Water Cooler conversions. It is really really really easy, and pretty cheap. For a 5G HLT, you are looking at about $60. With 1500 Watts I can use it in most GFCI sockets, and it gets (5G) water to temp in under an hour.

*5G Cooler: Was $15 at WalMart
*1500W/120V element: $10 or less
*1" Plastic Nut, (<$1) look in the Electrical by the conduit
*Use the Rubber seal that comes with the element
*Machine Bushing (<$1) bring the rubber seal in and get one that fits as tight as you can around it
*Thermometer: $6 mechanical
*Drain: $18 at bargain fittings for a kit, or $10 for ball valve, nipple, Stainless Washers, and elbow
*Extension cord (Check Amp Rating!) $10

I spent about an hour or two putting it together, and there are lots of instructions, like these:

http://www.wortomatic.com/articles/The-Electric-HLT-(or-how-I-built-a-water-heater-in-a-cooler)
 

gunner11

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Seriously, look at the Water Cooler conversions. It is really really really easy, and pretty cheap. For a 5G HLT, you are looking at about $60. With 1500 Watts I can use it in most GFCI sockets, and it gets (5G) water to temp in under an hour.

*5G Cooler: Was $15 at WalMart
*1500W/120V element: $10 or less
*1" Plastic Nut, (<$1) look in the Electrical by the conduit
*Use the Rubber seal that comes with the element
*Machine Bushing (<$1) bring the rubber seal in and get one that fits as tight as you can around it
*Thermometer: $6 mechanical
*Drain: $18 at bargain fittings for a kit, or $10 for ball valve, nipple, Stainless Washers, and elbow
*Extension cord (Check Amp Rating!) $10

I spent about an hour or two putting it together, and there are lots of instructions, like these:

http://www.wortomatic.com/articles/The-Electric-HLT-(or-how-I-built-a-water-heater-in-a-cooler)
So the 1500W element is about the max for a standard household GFI outlet? I am a real rookie when it comes to working with electricity so I guess that is why I am a little nervous about building something to put in water. I do have a 220V that my clothes dryer plugs into that I could use. Is there anything that I could purchase that is UL approved instead of building one on my own?
 

Cpt_Kirks

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I will try to post some pics of my "work in progress" dual 2kw heatstick HLT lid this weekend.

4000 watts should get 10 gallons up to temp pretty quick.
 

Wayne1

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offers this



I have never used one and don't know anything about reliability.

It does have a control for variable temps and it also comes with a GFCI.
 

Bjornbrewer

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with a standard 20 amp household circuit (with GFCI of course) you can run a 2000W heating element no problem. I heat up 10g of sparge water this way and it takes about 90min...start at the beginning of my mash and mash for 90min. works out well for me.

240V (it's not 220 by the way :D) isn't nessasary unless you're trying to boil water or heating quickly.
 
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Can anyone point me to plans for electric HLT using a converted 15 gal keg and 220V is avail as well as piped natural gas. I plan to use gas for boil, electric/electronic control of HL and spathe. No plans yet for heating mash, not in that league yet :-/
Sorry if it's been posted before, I tried searching for a while
 

kappclark

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240V (it's not 220 by the way :D) isn't nessasary unless you're trying to boil water or heating quickly.
Yes - I use 1 1000W 120V bucket heater in a 10G Rubbermaid cooler to prepare strike water.. I set a timer the night before to get the water heated when I come down in AM..takes abt 3 hours..For the sparge water, I re-fill cooler, add a second heater and it is ready in abt 1 hour. I don't boiling with 120 -- I still do that outside on the porch w/propane.
 
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Well, people refer to it as 240 because I think that's the max it can be. Mine measured around 230V. So I have this vintage Omega PID Controller that has a 1 A triac output. I want to use my 12V DC relay (25A 300v) to switch the 4500W element. Any wisdom you can offer me on how to drive the relay? It'd be great if I could hack into the controller and use the gate signal from the output triac (which should be DC)
 

SpartyParty

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Can anyone point me to plans for electric HLT using a converted 15 gal keg and 220V is avail as well as piped natural gas. I plan to use gas for boil, electric/electronic control of HL and spathe. No plans yet for heating mash, not in that league yet :-/
Sorry if it's been posted before, I tried searching for a while
everything you could ever need about electric brewing can be found here at www.theelectricbrewery.com
 
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