Electric brew-boss wiring help

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Alexholsch

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Hey guys, Im new at electric brewing and my knowledge of circuits and stuff is at a beginner level. I will hire a profesional electrician to do the wiring work but im trying to not only understand further but also save some money. Also I am setting this up in Mexico and I would like to know a bit of what im talking about because electricians here tend to take advantage of ignorant customers.

So to go from the beginning, here in Mexico there are many different primary converters or fuse boxes (the main power boxes that bring down the current from the main street lines). I have found 110v monophasic, 220v monophasic and 220v triphasic. The brew boss operating manual says you have three cables, 2 hot and 1 ground so it sounds like I need a 220v biphasic fuse box. I have asked around and it seems that the only 220v options are either mono or triphasic. So my first question is could I hook up to a triphasic? Im pretty sure mono won't work if I have two hot wires correct?

From the main fuse box I want to put some circuit breakers or something to act as a fail-safe so if I have a circuit short it won't burn the main house fuse box. What would you guys recommend? Im also putting in a GFCI. Don't know if im missing something, my component list is as follows:

15 meters of 10/3 cable, bronze
1 GFCI
1 fail safe circuit breaker or something of the sort
1 L6-30R receptacle

I have looked for diagrams online but can't find anything, any link will be welcomed.

Thanks guys! im dying to brew and this the only thing holding me back.
 

doug293cz

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You don't want to mess with 3-phase. Single phase 220V will work just fine. The heating element and electronics don't really care where the zero reference voltage is. You will have 0 to 220V rather than -110 to +110.

Brew on :mug:
 

doug293cz

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Went to look for more information on Brew-Boss systems, and was met with this:

1638916537821.png


Doesn't look promising.

Brew on :mug:
 
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Alexholsch

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thanks Doug , Yeah I think covid hit them hard, kinda sucks their stuff is wonderful. So single fase 220v has two hot cables and a ground? I thought I needed a fase for each hot wire.
 

doug293cz

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thanks Doug , Yeah I think covid hit them hard, kinda sucks their stuff is wonderful. So single fase 220v has two hot cables and a ground? I thought I needed a fase for each hot wire.
In the USA, 240V has two hots, and is called split phase, as the two hots are equal voltage and opposite polarity. In most of the rest of the world 220 - 240V is single phase, with one hot and one neutral. The same amount of current flows in both the hot and neutral, it's just that the neutral stays at near 0 voltage since it is connected to ground at the service panel (main fuse/breaker box.)
When fusing wires, you only have to fuse the hot wires. So, in the USA we need to fuse (and switch) both hot wires. In single phase areas, you only have to fuse (and switch) one wire.

For equipment that requires only 220 - 240V to operate, it really doesn't matter if it is supplied with single phase or split phase.

Brew on :mug:
 
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Alexholsch

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In the USA, 240V has two hots, and is called split phase, as the two hots are equal voltage and opposite polarity. In most of the rest of the world 220 - 240V is single phase, with one hot and one neutral. The same amount of current flows in both the hot and neutral, it's just that the neutral stays at near 0 voltage since it is connected to ground at the service panel (main fuse/breaker box.)
When fusing wires, you only have to fuse the hot wires. So, in the USA we need to fuse (and switch) both hot wires. In single phase areas, you only have to fuse (and switch) one wire.

For equipment that requires only 220 - 240V to operate, it really doesn't matter if it is supplied with single phase or split phase.

Brew on :mug:
Awesome! I was really scared to wire the PID with a monopahse 220V!
 
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