Ec-1118

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specter623

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I just got 2 packs of this for my first batch of mead...

I've been reading about it, but it looks like I made a mistake now and I should have gotten EC-1116, or D-47.

any ideas? I'm trying to make a semi-dry (more on the dry side, not too sweet) mead, so should I just use these or drive back out to switch the yeast?

Edit: Thanks for any response ahead of time :D
 

Cheeto

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EC-1118 is a very strong yeast.
I feel that the with mead you want to make the yeast you have would be a wrong choice.

-Jason
 
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specter623

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Any idea of what I should get then?

I want to make a semi-dry, on the dry side mead. I'm using 15 lbs of orange blossom honey. The temp. where I am at ranges between 20c and 30c. Which yeast would be the best to get around a 14% ABV?
 

Cheeto

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either of the two should work, I am not a Mead maker, but I do make lots of ciders

EC-1118 is good to 18+% and will really dry your mead out !

-Jason
 

soonann

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i made a batch with EC1118 before. i added in 8kg of wildflower and the result was something like a honey liqueur. pleasant in a way... :)
 

Travel_mon

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I've used EC-118 on a few occasions and what I've found is that it really dries out the mead. If you use it, either be ready to add some potassium sorbate to stop fermentation when your desired semi-dry range has been achieved. Or plan to age it for a long time and that usually helps. You can always back sweeten to taste too.

As for other choices on yeasts, I prefer to use D47 for just about all my meads, it finishes out where I like my meads to be which is somewhere in the middle of sweet and dry.
 

jonathanshearing

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i made a batch with EC1118 before. i added in 8kg of wildflower and the result was something like a honey liqueur. pleasant in a way... :

i just started mine with 9kg and added EC1118 i was wondering was it strong and did it have any sweetness left or did it end up dry?
 

BorealBrewer

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1118 is a hungry, hungry yeast. For a semi-dry mead, you will want to use sorbate, or back sweeten with something unfermentable (xylitol works well), or, carbonate and have nice sparkling dry mead.

I love 1118 in fruit mead. The dry finish lets the fruit flavour and aroma through, and the dry nature of the mead surprises folks!
 

sweetcell

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if you're aiming for 14%, you're better off using a yeast that will naturally peter out in that range instead of using an 18% yeast and knocking it down with sorbate.

D47 is a great yeast but it's quite temp sensitive. i've read a lot of stories about the need to keep it under 70*F or it will throw a lot of fusels. 71-B is more forgiving that way and seems to be the "in" yeast these days. seems like every panelist at NHC this summer was talking up 71-B.
 

fatbloke

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Or of course, you can just use "the swiss army knife of yeast" - K1-V1116.

Hardy, high alcohol, low nutrient requirement, low sulphur producing, pretty much the widest temp range of Lallemand's offerings and a good yeast for meads, particularly traditionals....

Just make it to your required strength, but ferment it dry. Stabilise it then back sweeten with your choice of varietal honey.....
 

Robusto

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Fatbloke and the others are correct. Calculate where you want it to end up ABV wise and then sorbate and back sweeten to your desired sweetness level. I do this a bit with EC-1118. I like it because it is dependable and very neutral (imparts little flavor of its own).

Fatbloke- not to doubt you, but 15lbs in a 5 gallon batch (I assume)… K1v will take that dry as well, right?
 

Arpolis

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15lb of honey will give an OG +-1.108. If taken dry will be anywhere from 14% - 14.5% ABV. K1V-1116 will take that bone dry but 1116 works well with the floral characters of honey and you may be surprised at how well it is dry. But adding both sorbate and Camden/k-meta and 12 hours later a little honey sweetens it if ya want.

I agree 1116 is a great yeast. 71b is good because it is pretty neutral with traditionals but a very clean fermenter with no off flavors due to low nutrient musts. 71b really shines with fruit meads so 1116 may be the way to go for more character.
 

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