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EC 1118 For Fruit Wines???

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jonereb

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I used 1118 for muscadine last autumn, which I'm getting close to back sweetening. This summer I hope to start a gallon or two of plum wine. Should I use 1118 or is there a better yeast that I should consider for plum wine?
 

lukebuz

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I really like Cotes Des Blancs for fruity wines. Less harsh, more flavor.
 

Mismost

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I have a batch of plum wine working right now using EC1118...why? Because it was what I had on hand at the time. It is a workhorse yeast. I used it on the last batch of plum too. But, I have read where it can strip out some of the fruit flavor and my last kind of proved that...not much plum flavor early on....haven't opened a bottle in while, still not a year old yet....so, it may improve.

Here is a link to a yeast chart you may find helpful:

https://winemakermag.com/yeast-strains-chart

Another thing I learned last year with that first plum wine...it was VERY clear going into the bottle. After a month or so, there was a fine dusting of sediment in the bottle. That was after Sparkloid fining and racking twice and sitting for a few months before bottling. This batch, I will do the same and filter before bottling.
 

PTS_35

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Question about sparkalloid. I just got some for riesling I plan on making. But I have blackberry wine sitting for its 2nd month in 1 gal glass jugs. When I racked it did appear hazy. Can you add sparkalloid at any time? Meaning can I add it to the blackberry and let it sit another month as the instructions say before bottling?
 

Mismost

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Question about sparkalloid. I just got some for riesling I plan on making. But I have blackberry wine sitting for its 2nd month in 1 gal glass jugs. When I racked it did appear hazy. Can you add sparkalloid at any time? Meaning can I add it to the blackberry and let it sit another month as the instructions say before bottling?
I would first make sure that you have really degassed the wine before adding sparkalloid. I have used both early and late additions and both worked great for me.

My first time using sparkalloid was on a plum wine that looked like gravy...within 24 hours there was a 2" thick band of settled out crud on the bottom of the carboy, the wine above was clear enough to read a newspaper through. Amazing stuff in my book!
 

pumpkinman2012

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Sparkolloid can be used any time after aging.
As for EC-1118, it is a workhorse yeast that has proved to be able to ferment even in not so optimal conditions, this is why it has been part of most kit wines.
That said, it is a neutral yeast that does not contribute any sensory effects, nor will it enhance any varietal characteristics (when making wine from grapes) , most yeasts can bring out various characteristics such as mouthfeel, floral and fruity aromas.
I recommend using 71B-1122, it brings out aromas, and softens the wine by metabolizing a portion of malic acid.

I hope that this helps
 

pumpkinman2012

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For kit wines, the directions usually call for stirring the wine for a certain amount of time to expel CO2, however, the majority of the CO2 produced during fermentation dissipates naturally, time will do the rest for you, as you age your wine.
Take care to avoid stirring the wine too fast and actually incorporating oxygen into the wine, you want to avoid your wine becoming oxidized.

I hope that this helps
 

PTS_35

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Yes. And thanks. The airlock has actually sucked back a while ago. I'm gonna leave it alone. At the full 2 months I'll add sparkalloid and then give it another month before I bottle. That's the plan any way
 

fsr_racer

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Sparkolloid can be used any time after aging.
As for EC-1118, it is a workhorse yeast that has proved to be able to ferment even in not so optimal conditions, this is why it has been part of most kit wines.
That said, it is a neutral yeast that does not contribute any sensory effects, nor will it enhance any varietal characteristics (when making wine from grapes) , most yeasts can bring out various characteristics such as mouthfeel, floral and fruity aromas.
I recommend using 71B-1122, it brings out aromas, and softens the wine by metabolizing a portion of malic acid.

I hope that this helps
I agree. I've used EC-1118 for its neutral character and high abv tolerance. It's great for getting a baseline set, then trying other yeasts in subsequent batches until you find the one that compliments your recipe the best.
 
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jonereb

jonereb

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Regarding Plum Wine recipes: one recipe I read on-line called for 4 lbs of fruit per gallon of wine. Seems a little low to me. What say ye?

This recipe also said don't use pectic enzyme. Again, what say ye?
 

Yooper

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Regarding Plum Wine recipes: one recipe I read on-line called for 4 lbs of fruit per gallon of wine. Seems a little low to me. What say ye?

This recipe also said don't use pectic enzyme. Again, what say ye?
4-5 pounds/gallon seems about right. Plums, at least the wild plums and the ones I use, are very acidic and high in malic acid. More plums would mean a very tart wine in the end.

I use pectic enzyme in my plum wine. I can't imagine why you wouldn't.
 
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jonereb

jonereb

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I'll be using homegrown plums. Don't know the variety. I have two plum trees. One is of Japanese origin. Okay, I'll go with 4 - 5 lbs.
 
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