Easiest business, Bar or Brew Pub ??

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illnastyimpreza

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I have always wanted to open my own business of some sort. But I have never really been able to pin point it down to a certain type.

My girlfriend has been wanting to open a coffee shop/muffin bakery for a while now. I on the other hand am interested in beer.

I have read all the threads on how retarded expensive to start a micro brewery, due to start up costs or machinery and such...

But would a Bar or Brew pub be easily achievable ? What would be the easiest way to go about starting an on spot serving business...

How would it be SO much different than a restaurant ? As long as I don't rely HEAVILY on any specific product I sell, shouldn't it be much less risky ?

I already have SOO many ideas about homemade sauces, an organic/gluten free beer and foods list, special events, open mike night, lady's night, and sponsorships around different automotive races and such ( I'm a car guy as well)

any ideas guys ???

If I'm able to purchase a couple acres up in NH I will probably at least give it a try :)


BTW this will probably be located in NH ...or northern MA if its easier...
 

beesy

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Whatever you do, go for it. I think a lot of us dream about our own microbrew until reality sets in. I love brewpubs and prefer them as my place to hang out. Good food + good beer + good location + good staff = $$ :mug:

P.s. let us know when you get rollin' and i'll drive up next time i'm in Boston!!
 

flyangler18

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I'd PM NQ3X. His consultancy experience will help you here.

First question - do you have a business plan and the capital?
 

woollybugger2

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Owning a business of any kind is a lot of work, restaurants a quite risky in general, with a lot of overhead, adding a brewery to the equation add a significant amount of cost and complexity with additional regulations, inspections, licenses.

That being said, go for it, especially if you can raise the venture capital to make it happen!
 
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illnastyimpreza

illnastyimpreza

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well I am probably going to be buying land and moving to NH anyway... so this is probably something I would do some ways down the road. But yeah I guess my biggest battle would be capital huh ? :p ... and making sure I open somewhere attractable to people :)


There are SO many businesses going under right now, it should be relatively easy to pick up ALL the equipment and supplies I need pretty cheap...
 

Bob

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[replied to get this in my Watch This Thread list]

Let me know when you're ready to talk about this concept in detail.

Observation: If it's "retarded expensive" to start a microbrewery, why on earth do you think it'd be easier - or not "retarded expensive" - to start a microbrewery with a restaurant attached to it?

Yeah! All the hassle and expense of two businesses instead of one! That's much less "retarded"!

Just sayin' you might want to reexamine your logic, young Padawan. :D

Bob
 

TexasSpartan

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Not that I've ever attempted to start a brewery or brewpub, but I can't imagine either of them are easy.
 
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illnastyimpreza

illnastyimpreza

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[replied to get this in my Watch This Thread list]

Let me know when you're ready to talk about this concept in detail.

Observation: If it's "retarded expensive" to start a microbrewery, why on earth do you think it'd be easier - or not "retarded expensive" - to start a microbrewery with a restaurant attached to it?

Yeah! All the hassle and expense of two businesses instead of one! That's much less "retarded"!

Just sayin' you might want to reexamine your logic, young Padawan. :D

Bob
Not having all your eggs in one basket helps a lot. I've learned a few things in all the business classes I took in college... but one thing they don't teach you is how to grow the balls to actually pull the trigger on a business

This is really just a feeler thread I think... I don't think I have anywhere close to the funds to start my own large business right now.... I wish it where cheaper...but then EVERYONE would do it :rolleyes:

I find it exceedingly easy to frequent either one without hesitation.
hence the reason I would like to open one :)
 

Laughing_Gnome_Invisible

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I think the key is in the thread title. Which is easier? To me, that sounds like a question that indicates a lack of conviction in the project. Just my .02 :)
 

david_42

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A bar is much easier than a brewery or brewpub, fewer permits and less capital. Plus, as you note, many businesses are folding. But, if a bar/restaurant has failed at a location, it is extremely unlikely that you would have better luck.
 

mmb

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A bar is going to have some sort of food service anyway, even if it is just sandwiches and a deep fryer.

It WILL be easier to purchase and existing bar w/ liquor license than it will be to get a new license. It may even be impossible to get a new license, depending on what the township/county ordinances say where you are looking at locating.

Get one half of the business down before opening a brewery too. Running a brewpub is basically two completely different businesses under one roof.
 

HenryHill

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The Michigan Brwery was just an old remodeled semi repair garage, off an interstate, behind a large gas station. It started as a small brewery and tiny pub; peanuts on the floor, all wood pub with an old carved wooden bar from an bar auction, cardboard coaster collection on the ceiling. Initially just a few taps, and a LHBS that was a buyout of an older guys retirement venture. To get a sign on the interstate, ya know one of them food, gas, and hotel blue signs, they started offering cold sandwiches and GFS chili. Take out beer and corny fills. It took several years for things to get any acceleration, but this was during the old days when few knew there was such a things as craft beer. There was much turnover, then the move into a giant facility, the purchase of Celis from Texas, added hot sandwiches and pizzas, contract brews, contract root beer, a larger 30bbl brewhaus, and now 16 taps and a great hot food selection.

Actually, the combination of LHBS, good basic collection of beer recipes, and time, coupled with the newer awareness of craft brew, made it sustain early. And now, a multi-venture consortium all under one roof with distilling, LHBS, brewery, brewpub/restaurant and multi state distribution.

Key to this was the depth of pockets to acquire brewery materials, vessels, equipment, on a regular basis, by auctions.
 

TrojanMan

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First off, do NOT even think about starting a business with a girlfriend. Also, don't even think about buying a house together or entering any other major financial agreement.

The biggest problem you're going to have in the beer industry is compliance with liquor laws. Of course, there are going to be legal hurdles with any business, but the beer world just has a few more of them.

Remember also that good food and good beer are requisites for a successful business but they are NOT something that can make up for a shortcoming elsewhere. You can make the best beer in the world, but you can't expect that to do anything for your business. Having a good product does not guarantee success, even though having a bad product dooms you to failure. There's more to selling beer than making good beer.


Lastly, do not assume you know about something just because you like it. Say you're decorating a brewpub, for instance. Just because you like a certain look doesn't mean that look will sell your beer the best.

The one thing all successful business owners have in common is that they know where to go for help and they know how to ask the right questions.

Good luck.
 

rjhockey

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Not trying to put you off by any means, but I started a steak house about 10 years ago now, but the start up costs alone in a pre existing building was in the 400k range (That included legal, and licensing). I didn't brew beer but take into account that from my research alone that commercial equipment isn't cheap, means VERY deep pockets since its near impossible to find angel round investors for places like this.

There is some hope though as most counties have some sort of investment program that will aid new business.
 

epimortum

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Good luck man, I've always wanted to start my own Inn/B&B with home made food/drink. Its a tough road. I would say one of the only thing as important as deep pockets is location, location, location.

Some areas simply won't take to it, the people / area just won't support it OR there would be too much established competition you might not be able to compete with as an upstart. It can be a dismal road if ill traveled.
 

samc

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Best advice I always give people looking to go into business is go work for someone else for awhile. See what is involved and carefully watch the stress that the owners go through - then if you are still into it start planning. If they people you work for won't be direct competitors then you might ask them for advice. I went into my businesses with a lot of knowledge upfront and still had to work 80 hour weeks for years to be successful. In the end it was worth it, but it was by no means easy and just because you love to brew, drink, cook, etc. does not mean you will have fun when your living depends on it.
 
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