Dunkel Hefeweizen Yeast Selection Dilemma

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eRicphtgr

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Hi guys, I am planning to do a dark hefeweizen recently and planning to use NZ yeast, Mangrove Jack's.

This is my selected grains and hops.

Weyermann pilsner - 5 lb
Weyermann pale wheat - 5 lb
Belgian Chocolate - 0.6 lb
Belgian Biscuit - 1 lb

Hallertau Mittelfruh & East Kent Golding

Now I am in selection of yeast. From your point of view, will Mangrove Jack's M20 or M21 suits above style?
 
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eRicphtgr

eRicphtgr

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I'd definitely use M20 for a Dunkelweizen. The M21 is a witbier yeast.
Thanks for your feedback. I was worrying about the banana and bubblegum flavor will overcome the roasted malt flavor from it. :confused:
 

cswis86

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Ferment on the cooler end of the temperature range and you'll be fine. Roast character is pretty strong.
 

cswis86

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No I haven't. I've used the WB-06, Wyeast 3068, and Wyeast 3638 for hefeweizens. 3068 is my favorite. I say give M20 a try or do a split batch.
 

Smellyglove

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Don't do M20. This is the worst hefe-strain I've ever tasted. I'm not fond of WB-06 either as I feel it's more of a wit-strain. If you want to do a hefeweizen I'd say you'd have to go liquid. I've tasted several M20 beers and they feel like plastic, comparing to steel, if you know what I mean. They try, but cant even reach the bottom shelf.
 
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eRicphtgr

eRicphtgr

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Ferment on the cooler end of the temperature range and you'll be fine. Roast character is pretty strong.
sounds like a plan to me. will get it ferments at 18C and see what's the outcome :)
 
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eRicphtgr

eRicphtgr

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Don't do M20. This is the worst hefe-strain I've ever tasted. I'm not fond of WB-06 either as I feel it's more of a wit-strain. If you want to do a hefeweizen I'd say you'd have to go liquid. I've tasted several M20 beers and they feel like plastic, comparing to steel, if you know what I mean. They try, but cant even reach the bottom shelf.
I am now fermenting a belgian witbier with WB-06. I control the temperature at 18-20C and it smells creamy and flower sweetness. Very less banana flavor yet. It is now setting there for 8 days.

You scare me out now :( worrying what will my witbier taste like
 

Smellyglove

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I am now fermenting a belgian witbier with WB-06. I control the temperature at 18-20C and it smells creamy and flower sweetness. Very less banana flavor yet. It is now setting there for 8 days.

You scare me out now :( worrying what will my witbier taste like
But, I said that wb-06 to me is more like a wit-yeast than hefe. You're making a wit..I believe you misunderstood me. But I ferment mine at 24C for four days, then bring it down. Gives me some citrusy and spicy phenolics.
 
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eRicphtgr

eRicphtgr

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But, I said that wb-06 to me is more like a wit-yeast than hefe. You're making a wit..I believe you misunderstood me. But I ferment mine at 24C for four days, then bring it down. Gives me some citrusy and spicy phenolics.
ops, I misund. doesn't 24C brings up the banana flavor?
 

thehaze

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Warmer temps. accentuates the banana esters, which I personnaly love more than the clove in hefes.
 

Smellyglove

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I get no banana esters from that yeast when putching one pack without rehydration into 14L.
 

thehaze

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There are no good Hefe dry yeasts out there. I only used 3068 and works like a charm.
 

ncbrewer

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I use Danstar Munich and Munich Classic for hefes, and I've been really happy with the results.
 

lasultana

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There are no good Hefe dry yeasts out there. I only used 3068 and works like a charm.
Yes there are.

Danstar Munich Classic - dry 3068. And also imo the M20 (no idea why this thread says its a bad yeast).

greets from germany
 

thehaze

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Yes there are.

Danstar Munich Classic - dry 3068. And also the M20 (no idea why this thread says its a bad yeast).

greets from germany
If Danstar Munich Classic is the dry equivalent of 3068, then that is very good news.

I haven't used that yet, but I will give it a try. Thanks for the info.
 

Smellyglove

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There's a thread about that Danstar yeast here somewhere where the results where pretty lacking.
 

lasultana

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If Danstar Munich Classic is the dry equivalent of 3068, then that is very good news.
Well yeah. At least that's the information spread here in Germany. It's supposed to be the Doemens 479 strain, which is the Weihenstephan W68 strain, which is the Wyeast 3068 strain.
:mug:
 

EDF713

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Well yeah. At least that's the information spread here in Germany. It's supposed to be the Doemens 479 strain, which is the Weihenstephan W68 strain, which is the Wyeast 3068 strain.

:mug:

I'm a long way from Germany, but I brewed a hefe with Munich Classic recently and was very happy, lots of banana and clove. Don't let the sulfur during fermentation scare you away.
 

EDF713

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my idea is to use it at a temperature of 63-65 F in the first 3-4 days of fermentation then slowly raise the temperature up to 68-69 F. Is it too low a temperature in your opinion?
I can't speak from experience since I only used it once and it was 4 years ago. Lallemand recommends 63-72 F, so that is probably fine. I know some have commented that different temperatures can lead to more or less banana or clove flavors, but I don't have enough experience to offer much of an opinion.

I know from other yeasts that the temperature matters most the first 3-4 days, and raising the temperature likely won't change the flavor, but it will help the beer finish more quickly. I do this on just about every beer I make.
 

deuc224

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I did a WLP 300 at 62 and got some banana upon transfer but it has mellowed out. Recipe sucked but the banana was very mild.
 
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