Dumping Yeast Slurry on the Compost Pile???

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Donasay

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I usually have quite a bit of yeast slurry left over and I was thinking of dumping it on my compost pile to get the thing jump started for the spring. I already throw quite a bit of spent grain there, so they might just all mesh together and have a good time. They sell bacteria in bags to add to your compost pile, to get it jump started, my only concern is that adding yeast instead of bacteria in a bag it will stink to the you know what and offend the neighbors, on a bad day the rotting grain gets a bit of a sour odor. Does anyone else currently do this? What are your results.
 

Klainmeister

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There's a brewery near where i live in Oregon that usually sells it's leftover yeast to farmers and people to use on their compost piles. It actually doesn't smell that bad from personal experience. In fact, i'd dare to say it smells BETTER than just letting it rot by itself. Some will survive and convert what's remaining into either ethanol or methanol which will evaporate or help reduce the wretched smell of a compost pile with fruit or what have you.
 

Zymurgrafi

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Go for it. If your pile is smelling you probably need to a) turn it more often b) keep it stacked higher. 4' is best to generate heat c)have a better mix of browns and greens etc.


Yeast is great to add. Anything organic in the right proportion except meat/fats is perfect.
 

kornkob

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Klainmeister said:
Some will survive and convert what's remaining into either ethanol or methanol which will evaporate or help reduce the wretched smell of a compost pile with fruit or what have you.
Of course then you have to deal with the drunk beetles hitting on your wife and puking on the house.



 
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Donasay

Donasay

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zero said:
Go for it. If your pile is smelling you probably need to a) turn it more often b) keep it stacked higher. 4' is best to generate heat c)have a better mix of browns and greens etc.


Yeast is great to add. Anything organic in the right proportion except meat/fats is perfect.

Well undoubtedly I need to turn my pile more often, I'll be the first to admit that. I just throw my spent brewing grain right on top then I throw leaves and stuff on top of that, the spent grain on top sitting in the hot weather does sour quite a bit more than weeds and leaves. I do need to get some more greens in there and some more air, I know the basics about composting, but didn't know if the yeast would throw off the delicate eco-system that is my rot pile.
 

EvilTOJ

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I did composting last year and I always dumped everything into the pile, and it didn't smell worse because of the yeast. Actually, the grains smelled much worse in the summer heat than the yeast and trub did.
 

hopsnbarley

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In order to give the yeast I am casting off into the wild the best chance at success I like to mix up the yeast slurry from a primary with the grains from a new batch and wish them well.
 

tugbucket

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lol, yeah nice necro

I've been dumping spent trub, cakes, grains etc.. into my compost bin for 3 years now. Just with dumping the 5 gallon kitchen scrap bucket in, I make sure to have at least some shredded paper to cover the new additions. I haven't had but once that the bin smelled bad really. Keeping green material covered helps.

Turned the bin this past weekend. Worms almost 2' long. Need to get a second bin going soon as well.
 

betarhoalphadelta

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Prior to the back lawn finally growing in, I dumped 3 batches worth of yeast cake onto a few bare spots that had been seeded the day before. Now our back lawn is the thing of neighborhood envy.
So if I dump a yeast cake into the grass, it won't cause issues? Any problem if it's a yeast cake from an IPA, and thus full of hop/trub material too?
 

rhys333

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Nobody else impressed by the almost 2' long worms? That's some crazy sheet right there.

All my brewing waste gets composted... grains, trub, old yeast. I've learned that it takes a LOT of browns to balance the pile though, especially when adding spent grain. For every 5 gallon batch worth of grain, at least half a garbage bag-full of crushed dried leaves goes in. I've considered mixing them 50:50 with wood chips to see how that works. There's a ton of nitrogen in all that grain.
 
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