Dumb question: Do you sanitize your gas lines before filling up a new keg?

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kef300

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I'm building a keezer, I already have all the parts and am finishing up the collar.

Before filling up a keg, I plan on filling it up with sanitizing solution, hooking it up to the CO2 set up at serving pressure, and letting some of the sanitizer solution run through my liquid line through the faucet to sanitize it. However, this leaves out the gas line.

Do you guys sanitize the gas line first before doing what I just mentioned? Is it necessary?

Side question:

How do you cold crash prior to racking to a keg. What I mean is, I can cold crash my fermenter in the keezer, but once I lift it up so that it can be siphoned by gravity, the sedimented yeast will be disturbed. How do you guys do this process?

Thanks!


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zachattack

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No need to sanitize the gas line unless beer backs up into it and it gets gross.
 

hunter_le five

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Do you guys sanitize the gas line fiets before doing what I just mentioned? Is it necessary?
No need to sanitize the gas line. All I do is spray some star san on the gas-in ball lock disconnect where it touches the gas post. If you're paranoid you might consider sanitizing the gas line before you assemble it the first time, but beyond that I wouldn't worry too much about it.

How do you cold crash prior to racking to a keg. What I mean is, I can cold crash my fermenter in the keezer, but once I lift it up so that it can be siphoned by gravity, the sedimented yeast will be disturbed. How do you guys do this process?
If you cold crash the primary for a few days, the yeast should be fairly well compacted on the bottom of the fermenter by the time you get ready to move it. Just be as gentle as you can and try not to slosh things around, and you should be fine. You might try using gelatin finings in conjunction with the cold crash to really help the sediment stick to the bottom. My yeast cake is always very dense and compact by the time I get ready to rack, so nothing really gets stirred up when I move it.
 

Howhownow

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Cold crash in the keg (even add gelatin for extra clarity). First pint or two will be cloudy, then nice and clear. I find it much, much more convenient. You can even carbonate while you do it.
 

Doed

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Are you talking about the gas "dip tube" inside the keg? If so, get a 7/8" socket and remove the keg posts from the keg. Lift out both the gas and liquid dip tube and just soak them in your favorite sanitizing solution.
 
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kef300

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Thanks a lot guys, it's all clear now.
Doed, no, I meant the tubing going from the regulator to the keg gas-in connection.


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