Duffle Bag Brew Bags

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Owly055

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The brew bags I've been using are made like a pillowcase, with corners that create a problem when lifting the bag out.... they want to pop out beyond the confines of the brew kettle. It's a nuisance to deal with, plus the bags don't really fit the kettle properly.... they bunch up, etc.
I've had two of them... get them from the LHBS......But there's got to be a better bag out there. The photos I see on line are still pillowcase bags, but often have a curved bottom seam instead of straight across.

It seems to me that a brew bag should be a full cylinder with a round bottom like a duffel bag, and should come in a size to fit your brew kettle, with the top belled out to go over the outside, like upside bell bottom trousers.

I'm wondering if anybody makes such a brew bag, and if so if it works as well as I assume it should.......


H.W.
 

Thedutchtouch

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The curved bottom bag works well and is easier to sew than a true cylinder. Typically BIAB bags are longer than the kettle/pot is tall, so the shape of the bottom of the bag doesn't matter when it's in the pot, and curved bottom keeps it from popping out the sides, and encourages the bag to center drain.
 

wilserbrewer

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If you are the type to overanalyze things and try hard to make it difficult for no benefit, then the cylinder shaped bags are for you. If you like a practical solution that works great, is easy to build or economical to buy, and also has less seaming to potentially fail, then a rounded bottom bag is for you. A rounded bottom bag, properly sized to the kettle will completely line the kettle, with enough to overlap the top rim by several inches, will also have a drawstring with cord lock to secure it in place on the kettle, and will also shape nicely when pulled from the pot directing the draining wort in a single stream to the center of the kettle.

IMO the biggest difference between a round bottom bag and a cylindrical bag, is well...about ten to fifteen bucks :)

Of course, the above opinion is heavily biased toward curved bottom bags.
 

L8-Again

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I fretted with the style of bag myself. I went with the curved bottom, or tear drop shaped. It worked great for me, no spilling over the edge. Made it myself with cheap polyester voile curtains. Basically got the width that closely matched my pot circumference, sewed it into a long tube, then measured the depth of pot, added 4 inches, cut an arc and stitched it up on a 40 yo sewing machine. Have enough left over to make another and have already made a hops bag, too.

Another thought, just have someone, or you, sew the bottom of your current bag into an arc by cutting off the corners. Then there is no wasted material! You'll only loose a couple of inches on the corners, not on the apex.:)
 

MaxStout

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I only had problems with the oblong grain bag thing when I used to brew in a keggle. The wet grain bag would not quite fit on its way out. But a little working with a mash paddle would shape it and make it fit through the opening.

Now that I use a regular brew kettle and have a Wilser bag made for it, it's a moot issue.
 

1977Brewer

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Apologies to Wilser, and I hope I get to make it right, but paint strainer bags are oblong for a reason. I love em. Listed for five gallons, I just brewed in an 8 gallon kettle with room to spare.
 

wilserbrewer

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wilserbrewer BIAB bags are what you want, they make to your specs
Thank you radio2, and now for a shameless yet informative plug....wilserbrewer's "Goodbye Winter Sale" is about to end very soon, when the snow is gone....so is the sale, and it is melting quickly!
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f244/wilserbrewer-biab-bags-goodbye-winter-sale-518333/
Free shipping sale, custom sized bags only $22 delivered. Have your new bag in hand for next weekend brewing :)

Thank you!
My apologies for the shameless plug...

Apologies to Wilser, and I hope I get to make it right, but paint strainer bags are oblong for a reason. I love em. Listed for five gallons, I just brewed in an 8 gallon kettle with room to spare.
Please, NO need to apologize 1977Brewer, lots of folks are happy using paint strainer bags...yet I don't know of of anyone that has used a polyester voile bag that still preferred a paint strainer. A voile bag will also likely outlast a paint strainer 10 to 1, also making them cheaper or comparably priced over the long run...

FWIW, I have never used a paint strainer as my batch size doesn't permit it.

Just my opinion...somebody get me off the stump :)
 
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Owly055

Owly055

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If you are the type to overanalyze things and try hard to make it difficult for no benefit, then the cylinder shaped bags are for you. If you like a practical solution that works great, is easy to build or economical to buy, and also has less seaming to potentially fail, then a rounded bottom bag is for you. A rounded bottom bag, properly sized to the kettle will completely line the kettle, with enough to overlap the top rim by several inches, will also have a drawstring with cord lock to secure it in place on the kettle, and will also shape nicely when pulled from the pot directing the draining wort in a single stream to the center of the kettle.

IMO the biggest difference between a round bottom bag and a cylindrical bag, is well...about ten to fifteen bucks :)

Of course, the above opinion is heavily biased toward curved bottom bags.


Ouch.......... That started out as kind of a slap in the face ........... The extra stitching amounts to how many minutes? ..............


H.W.
 

phug

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Not just the extra stitching but pinning the seams and having it all line up correctly . The complexity difference adds up significantly
 

wilserbrewer

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Ouch.......... That started out as kind of a slap in the face ........... The extra stitching amounts to how many minutes? ..............


H.W.
H.W.,

I apologize if that's how my comment was perceived, that was not my intent. I was directing it toward all that may feel the cylindrical bag is a superior design. I have no desire to make a bag of that design, IMHO the 3 dimensional shaping unnecessarily complicates the process for no benefit and is ultimately not as strong or durable. JMO
 
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Owly055

Owly055

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H.W.,

I apologize if that's how my comment was perceived, that was not my intent. I was directing it toward all that may feel the cylindrical bag is a superior design. I have no desire to make a bag of that design, IMHO the 3 dimensional shaping unnecessarily complicates the process for no benefit and is ultimately not as strong or durable. JMO
I get that all the time......... I manufacture things and often keep tweaking them and improving their useability........ and complexity as a result. People love to use things I build, but are bothered by the fact that they are complex. which means that Joe Farmer may not be able to understand and troubleshoot all the systems.



H.W.
 

RM-MN

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I get that all the time......... I manufacture things and often keep tweaking them and improving their useability........ and complexity as a result. People love to use things I build, but are bothered by the fact that they are complex. which means that Joe Farmer may not be able to understand and troubleshoot all the systems.



H.W.
You should see how complex the systems are that Joe Farmer uses these days. :p:D
 

Foosier

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I have used a pillow case type bag sewn from a full yard of Polyester Voile. It is way bigger than my 10 gallon pot. I do get the bunching and agree that is not desirable. As far as draining I never had an issue. Of course, I had a trick. I did not try to pull the bag out evenly. I would pull more from one seam so that the grain was gathered into one corner of the bag. Then when I pull the bag out the grain is basically in a cone formed by one corner of the bag. This ensured the wort ran from the bag in one nice consistent stream.

All that being said, I have purchased a wilser bag and look forward to not having to mess with the bag in that way as it was rather hot and sticky.
 
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Owly055

Owly055

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You should see how complex the systems are that Joe Farmer uses these days. :p:D
I do........ I work on many of them, though some of the most modern ones are only serviceable by dealer techs. A friend recently bought a quarter million dollar John Deer tractor.......not a huge tractor even. It has 5 onboard computers, and electronic diesel, a CVT transmission that requires special oil, and an auto steer system with GPS "auto turn". I don't know why they even bother putting a seat in something like that...... Does it really need an operator?? They don't even touch it.... They call the John Deer technician for anything other than tires, hydraulic hoses, etc.
I'll be 60 this year......... I seem to be obsolete, though really these systems are manageable if you have the equipment. Mechanically an engine is an engine, but only a guy who works on John Deere every day can own the trouble shooting equipment for the electronics.

H.W.
 
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