dry yeast starter

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ethangray19

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I searched for this topic and could not find it, though I am sure it has talked about alot.

I made a starter from dry nottingham yeast and then pitched it into my 1.062 OG IPA.

Is that a problem?? I made a starter for my last brew from liquid yeast and it worked so well i decided to go for it again but this time with dry yeast.

No problem here right???
 

devaspawn

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It's not necessary and some on here will even tell you not to do it. I have done with no troubles. The only thing you should do at a minimum is rehydrate it. No problems with creating a starter though in my experience. In fact my friend who's been brewing for 13 years does it for every batch and has never once had a problem from it.

I rehydrate typically in boiled wort and aerate the sh*t out of my wort. My fermentations usually start within two to three hours of pitching.

:tank:
 

FlyGuy

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It is generally not recommended for a few reasons:

- dry yeast manufacturers dry and package yeast at its optimum state, and making a starter can actually worsen the health of your yeast in many cases
- starters are often used to build up yeast cell count, but dry yeast cell counts are already very high, particularly if you rehydrate properly
- a packet of dry yeast is often cheaper than the malt extract used to make a starter, so if you need a lot of yeast, just pitch multiple packs of dry yeast

Having said all this, your beer isn't ruined or anything. There just aren't compelling reasons to make a starter with dry yeast.
 
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