dry yeast. starter?

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woody34

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Recd an extract kit as a gift with some safale05 dry yeast. Its a 5 gallon batch. Can I just pitch it in? Is 1 packet enough for a beer with a 1062 OG? And if dry yeast can simply be pitched, why would anyone ever mess with making a starter? Obvious noob here.
 

pabloj13

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Recd an extract kit as a gift with some safale05 dry yeast. Its a 5 gallon batch. Can I just pitch it in? Is 1 packet enough for a beer with a 1062 OG? And if dry yeast can simply be pitched, why would anyone ever mess with making a starter? Obvious noob here.
You can check things like that using the calculator at MrMalty.com. But in this case 1 packet is sufficient. People mess with making starters so that they can use liquid yeast which is available in a huge variety compared to dry yeast.

Edit: And you don't typically make starters with dry yeast because manufacturers use a process that builds up a number of factors to give the yeast a good head start. Making a starter negates that advantage.
 

kh54s10

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Dry yeast is made to be used without making a starter. There is a lot more yeast cells is a dry pack than there is in a liquid yeast pack/vial.

Most say it is better to re-hydrate the dry yeast and others just sprinkle it on dry. I have done both and have not seen a lot of difference but recently I have been re-hydrating.

So a starter is not necessary -> a waste of time and ingredients.
 

bullinachinashop

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Woody
If this is new to you, then just sprinkle it over the surface of the wort and you'll be fine.
Rehydrating the dry packet can have advantages, but if you don't have control over the temperature or the amount of water that you rehydrate in, you're better off just sprinkling dry.
There is a lot of good information that you can gather here, but for now, the miracle of fermentation will be enough.
Brew, sprinkle, wait, bottle, wait and then drink your miracle!
Good Luck,
Bull
 
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woody34

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Thanks guys. This may be an entirely separate thread question, but what are the primary advantages of using wyeast? Is it a flavor advantage or do they attenuate at a higher rate? I'm new and have been enjoying the simplicity of dry yeast. But if there's something I'm missing out on, I'll hop on the wyeast and starter bandwagon.
 

pabloj13

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Thanks guys. This may be an entirely separate thread question, but what are the primary advantages of using wyeast? Is it a flavor advantage or do they attenuate at a higher rate? I'm new and have been enjoying the simplicity of dry yeast. But if there's something I'm missing out on, I'll hop on the wyeast and starter bandwagon.
It totally just depends on the style you are trying to brew. A normal ale using a yeast that imparts minimal yeast character (i.e. generic stout, IPA, etc)? Dry yeast is absolutely fine. Specialty beers like Belgians, Saisons, etc? The Wyeast/White Labs liquid yeasts give you a number of varieties to choose from that give you a huge array of potential flavor profiles.

Also, the attenuation is dependent on the strain itself, not whether it is dry or liquid.
 
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woody34

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Ok.I think I understand. After I have some more experience, i plan on making a big beer, og 1085. Something I can cellar for a while. I assume most people here would urge me to use a wyeast and starter at that time?
 

pabloj13

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Ok.I think I understand. After I have some more experience, i plan on making a big beer, og 1085. Something I can cellar for a while. I assume most people here would urge me to use a wyeast and starter at that time?
Not necessarily. Again, depends only on the style. Making a big beer with liquid yeast? Make a starter. Making a big beer with dry yeast? Pitch two packets (or whatever MrMalty tells you you need).
 

bleme

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It depends on what you make. Many high gravity beers are fine with 2 packs of dry yeast. I've seen some crazy batches that used 3.
 
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