Dry Yeast: 2 Packets?

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Winesburg Ale

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Hey everyone

I'm planning to brew an extract batch of a lager-style beer. I bought a recipe kit that included a packet of Nottingham Ale yeast. I've got a couple extra packets of ale yeast in the 'fridge and I've heard that pitching more yeast can result in less yeast flavor, so I'm thinking "hey, maybe using 2 packets of ale yeast will give me a more lager-like flavor".

Has anyone tried this? I'd use the extra packet of yeast just to get rid of it, as long as it doesn't pose a threat the to well-being of the batch.

As an aside, I've made 5 batches of homebrew, all with dry yeast. I've used both Nottingham Ale and SAF Lager. I've really been happy with the Lager yeast. What would be the benefit of going to a liquid yeast, and do you think it is really worth the cost?

Thanks and have a good one!
 

WillPall

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All my answers are personal opinion, but first I wouldn't worry about pitching two packs. It's not going to hurt the batch at all, but I don't see the need.

Also, I greatly prefer dry yeast, mainly because I hate making starters. If you're going to use liquid yeast it's best to make starters, and yes it is way more expensive.

So there are my two pennies.
 

MikeFlynn74

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lager-like flavor".
You wont get that from pitching more yeast- You could get a closer lager like beer if you ferment it 55-60 degrees. But it will take a long ass time
 

Evan!

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Winesburg Ale said:
Hey everyone

I'm planning to brew an extract batch of a lager-style beer. I bought a recipe kit that included a packet of Nottingham Ale yeast. I've got a couple extra packets of ale yeast in the 'fridge and I've heard that pitching more yeast can result in less yeast flavor, so I'm thinking "hey, maybe using 2 packets of ale yeast will give me a more lager-like flavor".
You get less of that yeasty taste by letting it age in secondary the proper amount of time. A sachet of dry yeast, properly rehydrated, has plenty of cells for a standard-OG 5-gallon batch. Maybe if it's a barleywine, I'd use 2, but otherwise, it's a waste. You won't affect the "yeasty" flavor by pitching 2, though, as the symptoms of underpitching are underattenuation and excess ester production. The likely culprit for yeasty flavors is that there's still too much yeast in suspension, resulting from not enough time in the bright tank (secondary) and/or not properly pouring from the bottle, arising from the rousing of the yeast cake that's formed on the bottom.

As an aside, I've made 5 batches of homebrew, all with dry yeast. I've used both Nottingham Ale and SAF Lager. I've really been happy with the Lager yeast. What would be the benefit of going to a liquid yeast, and do you think it is really worth the cost?
I've brewed almost 70 batches and I still use dry yeast when I can. That means for batches that don't depend too much on the yeast for the character of the beer. Dry yeast strain selection is incredibly sparse, so if you wanted to brew a Witbier or a hefeweizen or a biere de garde or a saison, etc., etc., then liquid would be the way to go. All in all, liquid yeast is a better product, but I like the standard clean dry strains---Nottingham, US-05, US-04, S-23. I know that making starters is a pain in the ass, but it's well worth it in the end if the style demands it. So, short answer: yes, liquid yeast is worth the extra cost as long as the beer in question requires a specialized yeast strain. If it's just a pale ale or something hoppy, US-05 or Nottingham both work wonders. But there are many liquid strains that produce very specific results for very specific beers---so just do your research (and ask around here).
 
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