Dry Irish Stout - Creamy without Nitro?

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mattman91

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I do not have the ability to serve on nitro, and I am not looking to invest in that at this time.

I would, however, like to make an Irish Stout that would at least be creamy/have nice head retention.

Would adding 3-4% of carapils do the trick?
 

homebrudoc

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Flaked barley is part of the equation. Lots of flaked barley. Off the top of my head 10-15%. Mine is still in primary and Beersmith says it's 19% flaked barley. Guess I went a little heavy. I can certainly say I should have used rice hulls.
Hope this helps
homebrudoc
 
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mattman91

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Flaked barley is part of the equation. Lots of flaked barley. Off the top of my head 10-15%. Mine is still in primary and Beersmith says it's 19% flaked barley. Guess I went a little heavy. I can certainly say I should have used rice hulls.
Hope this helps
homebrudoc
Haha I decided to just brew an Oatmeal Stout (this Sunday). I'm going with 15% flaked Oats.
 

tyrub42

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Irish Ale yeast will help A LOT with a creamy mouthfeel and oats will be great, too. There are also 'stout taps' which are a poor-man's replacement for nitro. I believe they are perforated in a way that gets a lot of co2 out of solution and builds up a nice head of small bubbles, although I don't have one so I may be off on that.

Also since nitro is basically just causing a fluffy head that lasts forever and very little carbonation left in the beer, if you want the easiest way to get something similar, just don't carbonate it very much. Won't be as pretty but should feel similar 🍻🍻🍻
 

day_trippr

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Well...Having kept an imperial stout on a stout faucet running at 35 psi with 70/30 beer gas for nearly a decade continuously I'm inclined to believe one simply cannot produce a similar pour on straight CO2 - with or without an actual stout faucet. But it would be interesting to see some pics of the attempt...

Cheers!
 

monkeymath

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I have a Rye Porter that is just wonderfully creamy (bottled, not kegged). I attribute that to the rye malt and the yeast strain (WY 1469 West Yorkshire).
 

DuncB

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Look into using an ultrasonic jewellery cleaner to nucleate the CO2 in the glass and give that draught stout effect. Lots of videos of this on youtube. Haven't tried it myself as also have nitro setup. The ultrasonic cleaner is to replace the expensive and difficult to get guinness surger.
 

youngdh

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Use a syringe to inject air (which is 79% N2) just under the surface of your glass of beer. Draw up a little beer followed by equal amount air. Forcefully inject just under surface of your under carbonated beer.
 

Elric

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Well...Having kept an imperial stout on a stout faucet running at 35 psi with 70/30 beer gas for nearly a decade continuously I'm inclined to believe one simply cannot produce a similar pour on straight CO2 - with or without an actual stout faucet. But it would be interesting to see some pics of the attempt...

Cheers!
0696301D-750B-4A0F-8EB8-3F8DFCDF6C5D.jpeg

My irish stout is in the fermenter so haven't tested with it yet, but here are the results from my trying a stout spout with co2 at standard serving pressure on a best bitter. Gave a great head that had about 1/4” stay forever and helped give a smooth cask type feel by stripping a lot of the co2 out of solution. Doesn't look like I can upload videos, but when it pours it also very much has the traditional cascade effect.
 
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LD-Ordie

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Going to be brewing my first Irish Stout in the near future. I do have the correct faucet, but do not want to jump into the extra equipment for nitrogen until I feel it's something I want to stick with. Hoping for a decent first attempt
 

kevin58

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Use a syringe to inject air (which is 79% N2) just under the surface of your glass of beer. Draw up a little beer followed by equal amount air. Forcefully inject just under surface of your under carbonated beer.
^ This is how it was done back in the day.
 
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