Dry Hopping Pale Ales

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum:

rodwha

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2011
Messages
4,995
Reaction score
297
Location
Lakeway
So a pale ale, to me, was always just a simple beer, a small bittering addition followed by equal flavoring and aroma additions, never a dry hop. When I dry hop an IPA as a general rule I try to use the same amount of hops as I do for the entire beer. At what sort of rate does one dry hop a much less hop forward beer?
 

HM-2

Brewing by the seat of my pants
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jun 17, 2022
Messages
149
Reaction score
354
Location
UK
I've done one dry-hopped pale, and I used something like 7g/L in it (IIRC, about 125g in a 19L batch) which felt "about right" (though I overshot my intended IBU thanks to an overexuberant whirlpool which probably masked its effect somewhat).
 
OP
OP
rodwha

rodwha

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2011
Messages
4,995
Reaction score
297
Location
Lakeway
So you dry hopped yours at about the same rate as an IPA? Is that about right? I’ve wondered if half or 1/3 would even be worthwhile.
 

HM-2

Brewing by the seat of my pants
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jun 17, 2022
Messages
149
Reaction score
354
Location
UK
So you dry hopped yours at about the same rate as an IPA? Is that about right? I’ve wondered if half or 1/3 would even be worthwhile.
I forgot to update, I revisited by Brewfather and it was about 5g/L not 7g/L. 120g in 23L, so about what I'd usually dry hop and English IPA at, and about half of where I'd normally start for a West Coast.
 

monkeymath

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2019
Messages
688
Reaction score
794
I'm far from an expert on hoppy beers, but in my admittedly limited experience, alcohol contributes to the perceived hop punch. So using the same amount of hops in a lower abv beer will result in a less intensely hoppy beer.
I wouldn't dare use the (to me) absurd amounts some use in their DIPAs or NEIPAs, but I think 5g/l is a good starting point to figure out how you like your Pale Ale.
 
OP
OP
rodwha

rodwha

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2011
Messages
4,995
Reaction score
297
Location
Lakeway
I'm far from an expert on hoppy beers, but in my admittedly limited experience, alcohol contributes to the perceived hop punch. So using the same amount of hops in a lower abv beer will result in a less intensely hoppy beer.
I wouldn't dare use the (to me) absurd amounts some use in their DIPAs or NEIPAs, but I think 5g/l is a good starting point to figure out how you like your Pale Ale.
I’ve made quite a few 40-50 IBU pale ales, none of which were dry hopped, and they were all excellent, some better than commercial to me (HBC-342 is/was
amazing in a pale ale), though I use a small bittering addition to get 10-20 IBUs and load up the end, but I am a bit intrigued by dry hopping to improve it if it’s worth it, but also without hitting IPA levels.

For me the hoppy pale ale is something I can swap to after drinking a few IPAs or as an all day drinker targeting 5.2% ABV and 40+ IBUs.
 

mashpaddled

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2018
Messages
1,020
Reaction score
814
Location
Denver, CO
I wouldn't entirely agree or disagree with your explanation of a pale ale. It's especially tough to pin down because the lines blur into no real distinction. There are low ABV session IPAs but then pale ales clocking in at 6%. Some pale ales are dry hopped but some aren't. Some are just lower gravity IPAs, some are designed completely different. Some pale ales lean more malty, some more balanced between hop and malt character, some are very IPA all hops, all the time. I do think it is tough to make an IPA without dry hopping and give it that real sense of being an IPA. I find a pale ale can really go either way.

Personally, I don't dry hop pale ales. I tend to bitter at the start of the boil and then make one big whirlpool addition for aroma and flavor. I get plenty of clear, bright aroma and flavor out of that. These days I only add during the last half hour of the boil or flameout when I want the hops to take more of a backseat to the malt profile. (Plenty of great pale ales and IPAs use intra-boil and flameout additions.)

If you want to dry hop your pale ale, there is nothing wrong with dry hopping as aggressively as you might in an IPA. The best rule would be to taste the beer and decide whether it needs that fresher dry hop character and if so, how much would improve the beer. A safe bet for dry hopping pale ale/IPA is 1oz/gal (more would be appropriate for hazy styles) but even half or a quarter ounce per gallon might be appropriate for a pale ale. You can always add but never take back.
 

CascadesBrewer

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Mar 24, 2013
Messages
2,380
Reaction score
2,272
Location
VA, USA
I have had good luck dry hopping a Pale Ale in the 1 to 2 oz of hops per 5 gallon batch. The last few times I have switched to adding hops in a hopstand for 20 mins at around 180F. I find that gets me similar to the amount of hop flavor and aroma that I expect from a dry hop, without having loose hops in the fermenter to deal with. I tend to dry hop an American IPA at around 4 oz, and a NEIPA at 6 to 8 oz.

I agree that amounts are personal preference. I have a 4.6% ABV beer on tap now that had 3 oz in a hopstand. I am not sure if the beer is a Hoppy Blonde, Session IPA or Pale Ale...so I just call it a Summer Ale.
 
OP
OP
rodwha

rodwha

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2011
Messages
4,995
Reaction score
297
Location
Lakeway
I have had good luck dry hopping a Pale Ale in the 1 to 2 oz of hops per 5 gallon batch. The last few times I have switched to adding hops in a hopstand for 20 mins at around 180F. I find that gets me similar to the amount of hop flavor and aroma that I expect from a dry hop, without having loose hops in the fermenter to deal with. I tend to dry hop an American IPA at around 4 oz, and a NEIPA at 6 to 8 oz.

I agree that amounts are personal preference. I have a 4.6% ABV beer on tap now that had 3 oz in a hopstand. I am not sure if the beer is a Hoppy Blonde, Session IPA or Pale Ale...so I just call it a Summer Ale.
Hmmm, sounds like you just added something to my list to test, dry hopping vs whirlpool.

Something interesting is that you are adding your hopstand hops early, at a higher temp. What I had read years back was that the hotter the wort the more flavor you’d extract vs a lower temp being more aromatic. I attempted to test this but I lost interest in brewing for a bit.

For now I have 2 oz of high AA Cascade and Amarillo for single hop pale ales, maybe I’ll even use some Centennial. An ounce in 2.5 gals brings me into the low 40 IBUs, and that’s always been quite hop forward, but I may just have to try a dry hop of an ounce to see what it provides.
 

Miraculix

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2017
Messages
6,567
Reaction score
5,241
Location
Bremen

CascadesBrewer

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Mar 24, 2013
Messages
2,380
Reaction score
2,272
Location
VA, USA
Something interesting is that you are adding your hopstand hops early, at a higher temp. What I had read years back was that the hotter the wort the more flavor you’d extract vs a lower temp being more aromatic. I attempted to test this but I lost interest in brewing for a bit.

I have not played around with may different temps for hopstands. What I read is that around 180F is where the extraction of bitterness starts to drop off, so that temp seemed like a good balance of hop flavor extraction and lower bitterness while also being in a safe pasteurization temperature range. The temp usually drops 10F or so over the 20 minutes.
 
OP
OP
rodwha

rodwha

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2011
Messages
4,995
Reaction score
297
Location
Lakeway
I tend to whirlpool at ~170f (about 76°C), but I'll maintain using the element on my brewing system.
Why have you chosen 170°? It’s been quite some years now, but what I recall seemed to focus around the magic numbers of 185° and 155° for whirlpooling. I attempted to test this, but gave up on brewing for awhile.
 

HM-2

Brewing by the seat of my pants
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jun 17, 2022
Messages
149
Reaction score
354
Location
UK
Why have you chosen 170°? It’s been quite some years now, but what I recall seemed to focus around the magic numbers of 185° and 155° for whirlpooling. I attempted to test this, but gave up on brewing for awhile.
Because it's where I've personally got the best results- significantly reduced bittering compared to 80°C or up but should keep oils nice and soluble. I've never tried whirlpooling below 70°C but I have at or above 80°C and prefer the result from a lower temperature.

I'm pretty happy with my whirlpool utilisation and don't feel the need to experiment too much with something that works well for me, but YMMV.
 
OP
OP
rodwha

rodwha

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2011
Messages
4,995
Reaction score
297
Location
Lakeway
Because it's where I've personally got the best results- significantly reduced bittering compared to 80°C or up but should keep oils nice and soluble. I've never tried whirlpooling below 70°C but I have at or above 80°C and prefer the result from a lower temperature.

I'm pretty happy with my whirlpool utilisation and don't feel the need to experiment too much with something that works well for me, but YMMV.
Apparently I need to revisit testing whirlpool temps. I’ve generally cooled it quickly to 185° and then let it ride for 30 mins whirlpooling it here and there throughout. My temp drops down around 150° or so by the time I’m done. So for a good portion of my whirlpool I’m around your desired temp. I’ve liked what I got.
 

Latest posts

Top