Dry hopping gone wrong?

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deputybrewer

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Yesterday I bottled my first IPA which I dry hopped for 8 days. My racking procedures are not quite at "expert" level, and I noticed in some of my bottles there are a few chunky particles of hop pellets. I read about this on another thread some time ago, but cant seem to find it for the life of me! this shouldnt be too big of an issue should it? One would hope they would settle down in the next 3 weeks, but I am still curious.


Thanks in advance for the replies!:rockin:
 

ArcaneXor

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No, it's not a big issue at all. Most of them will probably settle to the bottom, and will stay in the bottle when you decant properly. A couple will make it into the glass, but the particles are so small that their taste isn't very perceptible. It may not be aesthetically pleasing, but it sure as hell is going to taste GREAT!
 

nutcase

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FYI I cut out part of a stainless steel strainer and wrapped it around the racking tube inlet. It filters almost all those guys out. I just opened a bottle of a my first dry hopped IPA yesterday and it poured super clear.
 
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deputybrewer

deputybrewer

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arcane congrats on your 1000 post! Im glad it was a reply to my question!
 

carnevoodoo

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FYI I cut out part of a stainless steel strainer and wrapped it around the racking tube inlet. It filters almost all those guys out. I just opened a bottle of a my first dry hopped IPA yesterday and it poured super clear.
I'd be wary of oxidation.
 

nutcase

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I'd be wary of oxidation.

u know I was wondering about that. But i dont really see how that could happen when its on the inlet?? So far i haven't had any oxidation issues that I can tell but my dry hopped beer is only about 4 weeks in bottles
 
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deputybrewer

deputybrewer

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I would think that by 4 weeks, you would know when you taste it, right?
 

nutcase

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I would think that by 4 weeks, you would know when you taste it, right?
I think it could take longer to really show itself. Ive heard otehr people mention the possible oxidation problem b4 but unless someone can explain to me how it could introduce oxygen on the inlet that is submursed in the beer I dont see how that would be the case. I could see the oxidation problem if it was on the outlet. Plus- Most of this beer is going to be all gone in another couple of weeks :)
 
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deputybrewer

deputybrewer

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I dont know how to go scientific in my explanation, but when you rack your beer into your bottling bucket from many small sources (the SS screen) as opposed to one source (your cane) you are forcing a large quantity of liquid to go through very small openings, and it holds the chance of creating some oxygen bubbles in the process, possibly oxidizing the brewski.
 

nutcase

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That makes sense but wouldn't a few small oxygen bubbles not really do anything? I tht you really needed quite a bit of o2 to do some damage. Plus all the co2 in solution shld help combat the o2 right?
 

Jamo99

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That makes sense but wouldn't a few small oxygen bubbles not really do anything? I tht you really needed quite a bit of o2 to do some damage. Plus all the co2 in solution shld help combat the o2 right?
I'd imagine that there isn't any O2 in solution after fermentation. Any O2 would have been consumed during the aerobic phase of yeast growth. As long as the racking inlet is the one wrapped and submerged, I don't see a reason why it'd cause oxidation. I can see that it might get clogged on a hoppy or very dry hopped brew, but not causing problems in general
 

GunnerMan

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Yeah a lot of people put screens on their racking canes, there is so little o2 in the beer and it is not flowing through the strainer fast enough to cause the o2 to separate from the water.
 

usurpers26

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My favorite method is to crash cool any of my dryhopped beers for a day or two before I rack them to the bottling vessel or keg. All the hops (I use pellet) fall to the bottom. No need to filter.
 

taylornate

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You guys have this all wrong. Oxygenation has nothing to do with modifying oxygen already in the liquid. Liquid that has oxygen in it has already been oxygenated. Oxygenation would be to add oxygen to the liquid from the air or from a tank. If you were able to do what GunnerMan and deputybrewer mentioned and separate the oxygen from the liquid then you would actually be deoxygenating.
 
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