Dry Hopping cold?

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Javaslinger

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I recently heard Scott Janish of Sapwood Cellars and the recent author of The New IPA, suggest that dry hopping around 58 could lead to less grassyness in big dry hops.

I'm interested in trying this but curious about the timing. I'm would imagine this would mean postponing any dry hop until after complete fermentation and a diacetyl rest.

Any thoughts on this?
 

Beer-lord

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I dry hop almost 80% of my beers and honestly, I've tried warm dry hopping, cold dry hopping, 3 days, 5 days, 10 days and notice very little difference. The only difference I can say I've noticed (or not noticed) is dry hopping any more than 5 oz seems to make little to no difference to me though dry hopping twice (5 days and 3 days) does seem to give me more aroma.
I've read the book, follow his blogs, listen to him on podcasts and enjoy the learning but to me, sometimes the science of brewing doesn't hold true to my final product.

Sorry, I'm actually no help at all!
 

bierhaus15

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In my experience it really depends on the variety and amount of DH used. For most noble hops and those with less intensity, I prefer to DH at a colder temperature (<55F) for a longer amount of time (5-7 days). This tends to result in less glassiness and more of the intrinsic flavors of the hops. For large DH using highly aromatic hops, a shorter and warmer DH is my preference (3-5 days, 60-65F). As for amounts, DH using more than 2 lbs/bbl tends to reduce hop definition and you often get higher amounts of polyphenols, grassy-vegetal and more generic hop character. There is obviously a lot more involved here, but I really think people would get better DH character via using less hops and increasing their higher extraction rate; less hops, less time, better extraction.
 
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