Dry hopping advice needed

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Zane99980

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Hello, greetings to everyone. This is my first time posting, but I have been reading tons of threads on here throughout my entire brew so thank you all for the wonderful information so far.

I have my very first beer in secondary fermentation in a 5 gallon glass carboy currently, I plan to bottle in roughly five days. I started out with a chinook single hop Brew kit from Northern Brewer and spruced it up a bit with my own additions of hops (mosaic and chinook in the boil, dry hopped with galaxy, cascade, and mt.hood so far) and a slight boost of DME (1/2 lb) to hopefully raise ABV.

The idea is to pack as much hop flavor and aroma as possible into it while hopefully raising the projected abv from 5.5 to at least 6.0, hopefully higher. Most of my hop additions were pellets but I have 1oz of whole cone Cascade in muslin bags that have been sitting in there for about four days. I want to add one final infusion of simcoe that will sit until bottling and I’m thinking about pulling out the cascade in order to make room for it.

Obviously the bags have swollen with liquid in the meantime and to pull them through the narrow neck of my carboy would definitely squeeze out quite a bit of the liquid inside of the hops which other people have cautioned me about doing.

Honestly, I am thinking that any of the oils or concentrated liquid that is squeezed out would only be beneficial to the flavor profile that I’m going for, especially since I’m not too picky on this first one. I’m just going for massive hop flavor, I have a more balanced all grain brew designed for next time.

From what I understand of the dry hopping process, it shouldn’t add too much bitterness, so the only downsides is that I can see are reduced clarity, which also is not a big deal, and “hop burn” (which I am not sure exactly what that is, but I’ve heard a lot about). I’m also worried that it might impart too much of a vegetal taste, A mild grassiness wouldn’t be too bad but I don’t want it to taste like I’m biting into Broccoli, you know? Any thoughts or advice would be most appreciated.
 
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Zane99980

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Update: I got impatient and pulled the bags, (fully sanitizing the area and tongs of course) as expected it did release a load of sediment particles into the brew, but I have long enough till bottling that it should settle out although I still anticipate a haze to some degree. I’m still curious to hear what you guys may think, did I just make a grave error? There’s no going back now so I guess i will just let you know how it turns out!
 

IslandLizard

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Welcome to HBT!

You're on the right track.
Unless you're intending to cold crash it for a few days, to increase clarity, I'd bottle that baby ASAP. Hops fade fast.

You would benefit reading around here a lot on brewing and packaging beer, especially IPAs. There's a bit more detail you need to pay attention to than NB's recipes makes you believe.

Here are 3 of the most common:
  • Control fermentation temps.
  • Secondaries aren't needed for most beers, it's even discouraged.
  • Avoid any and all air (oxygen) exposure after fermentation has started, especially with hoppy beers.
 
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Zane99980

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Welcome to HBT!

You're on the right track.
Unless you're intending to cold crash it for a few days, to increase clarity, I'd bottle that baby ASAP. Hops fade fast.

You would benefit reading around here a lot on brewing and packaging beer, especially IPAs. There's a bit more detail you need to pay attention to than NB's recipes makes you believe.

Here are 2 of the most common:
  • Control fermentation temps.
  • Secondaries aren't needed for most beers, it's even discouraged.
  • Avoid any and all air (oxygen) exposure after fermentation has started, especially with hoppy beers.
Thanks for the input and the welcome! I definitely took the NB instructions with a grain of salt. Besides this forum I have been working my way through “Designing Great Beer” by Ray Daniels which has been immensely helpful and of course I plan to continue perusing the forum for more info.


this first beer is really just to dip my toes in the wort so to speak. It’s kind of a Frankenstein monster and I took a lot of liberties with the original recipe based on what I’ve read so far. I will probably post my all grain recipe for the IPA that I plan on doing next as soon as I get it fully worked out, I’m curious to see what you guys think.

Overall as long as I don’t get any overly grassy flavors after this I should be fairly pleased with the outcome, I tasted a bit earlier in the week when I took a gravity reading and it’s definitely on the right track.

As far as secondary fermentation goes, I really only moved this one over to free up my other carboy, I have a fast ferment conical fermenter in the mail and will probably switch to that for my “house” beer and reserve the carboys for experimentation.
 
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Jag75

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Welcome to the brew hobby and forum . I guarantee you that you hang around here your brewing will get better and better faster. Some really good and knowledgeable brewers here.
 

CascadesBrewer

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Welcome. I hope your beer turns out well. I am not exactly sure how much hops you have dry hopped with. I find that 1 to 2 oz in a 5 gal batch give a subtle hop aroma boost, and 4 oz gives a really solid aroma. Some NEIPA style beers go higher (though I have read that around 1 oz per gal starts to hit saturation). I have never removed hops from the fermenter, but I usually just do one dry hop charge toward the end of fermentation (though I plan to play around more with early dry hop additions).

As far as "Designing Great Beer" goes. It really is an interesting book and I like how it has a decent intro to each style. I am not sure how much I like the usage of data from competition winning entries. Some of the content veers more from "how to brew a good porter" to "how to brew a porter that will win at NHC". I recently got a copy of "Brewing Classic Styles" and it seems to be a great introduction into recipes for each style.
 
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Zane99980

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Welcome. I hope your beer turns out well. I am not exactly sure how much hops you have dry hopped with. I find that 1 to 2 oz in a 5 gal batch give a subtle hop aroma boost, and 4 oz gives a really solid aroma. Some NEIPA style beers go higher (though I have read that around 1 oz per gal starts to hit saturation). I have never removed hops from the fermenter, but I usually just do one dry hop charge toward the end of fermentation (though I plan to play around more with early dry hop additions).

As far as "Designing Great Beer" goes. It really is an interesting book and I like how it has a decent intro to each style. I am not sure how much I like the usage of data from competition winning entries. Some of the content veers more from "how to brew a good porter" to "how to brew a porter that will win at NHC". I recently got a copy of "Brewing Classic Styles" and it seems to be a great introduction into recipes for each style.
That is a great point concerning data usage, I actually had not considered that although I was already planning on picking up a copy of “brewing great styles“ the next time I swing by my local bookstore, I can’t wait to dig into it.

In case you were curious, To dry hop i used 1 ounce of chinook, 1 ounce of mosaic and 1 ounce of mount hood put directly into the secondary before I racked it over, then after 3 days added an ounce of Galaxy and an ounce Cascade in Muslin bags which I just pulled out after another 3 days (so far so good, starting to clear up) and I then added one last ounce of Simcoe. The soonest I can bottle it is four days from now so I’m hoping I won’t get too much degradation in the meantime.

I had not heard that about reaching saturation, so perhaps I went a little overboard, I will read more into that and be a little bit more mindful of it in the future.
 

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