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dry hopped with Goldings and Fuggles... can't detect the aroma

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Pickngrin

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I just brewed a pale ale that I dry hopped with 1 oz. East Kent Goldings
and ~ .5 oz. Fuggles (pellets, for 10 days) after fermentation was complete.
I kegged it a few days ago, force carbonated it, and while it tastes good,
I am not detecting any enticing hop aroma. I don't know if I'm just used to commercial beers that are dry-hopped with very different types of hops (eg, Cascades) or if somehow I didn't get the effects of the pellets. Maybe I'm just not realizing that the scent of the beer is actually hop aroma?

I realize that this is a nebulous thing to analyze without smelling/tasting the beer, but any ideas?


Oh...the grain bill was 10# 2-row, 0.5# biscuit, 0.5# crystal 40L. OG was only 1.050 (had a sparging problem I think). Fermented at around 66 (if my Fermometer is correct!) with Wyeast 1968.

Thanks
 

cuinrearview

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I think that you are correct in assuming that the "C" hops have wiped your palate. Ten days with dry hops will definately impart a flavor and aroma even with the delicate noble varieties.
 

Plowboymiz

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I don't know, the best dry hopped beer I have done was a pale ale with cascade bittering and flavor, dryhopped with EKG. The EKG leaves a nice "floral" aroma that I thought balanced out the citrusy cascades. May be you are looking for a different aroma that you will not get out of these english varieties.
 

david_42

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Those hops are "floral, earthy and spicy". The nose won't be as intense as a citrus hop no matter what you do.
 
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Pickngrin

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I realize that it won't be that strong, citrusy aroma, but nothing in the aroma of this ale is registering as hops to me...maybe I have less awareness of the aromas of the noble hops than I thought
 
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Pickngrin

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Thanks... makes sense to me. I took another sample and I think what I assumed to be yeast is actually hop.
 

Tonedef131

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Next time you dry hop with a new variety keep some of the base beer seperate before dry hopping as a "control". This is a great way to get to know what aromas the hops are imparting.
 
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Pickngrin

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Next time you dry hop with a new variety keep some of the base beer seperate before dry hopping as a "control". This is a great way to get to know what aromas the hops are imparting.
Will do...thanks for the useful tip
 
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