Dry hop...ohhh...dry hop?!

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portguy

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Okay..so i've been experimenting with dry hopping (really...i'm new to it). I found it very strange the small amounts people use (in regular beers..not IPAs).

I dried hopped three beers so far:

1- Cream Ale (this one is just....GREAT...yea..i made it great!)
Hops for a 17 liter batch (in fermenter)

60 min- Aramis 6 gr
15 min- Aramis 6 gr
0 min- Aramis 6 gr for 15 minutes
Dry hop 2 days prior to bottling - Aramis 69 gr (yea...).

2- Saison
Hops for a 14 litre batch

60 min- EKG 23 gr
0 min - EKG 22 gr
Dry hop 2 days prior to bottling - Saaz 70 gr

3- Cream Ale (finishing fermenting) 14 liter

60 min- Target 5 gr
15 min- target 5 gr
0 min - Amarillo 10 gr for 10 minutes
Dry Hop- Amarillo 40 gr estimated 5 days

First batch is awesome. I think i love Aramis! Citrus and floral aroma...and Flavor. Nice..nice...nice...

Second batch is.....a Saison! Very faint hop aroma (in fact very similar to the ones i did not dry hop).

Third one... dunno, bur the aroma is nothing like the one Aramis hops gave me in fermenter...

So: why do ppl use so little hops when dry hopping???? I mean...i never brewed an IPA but, i'm thinking that for a 14 liter batch i would have to use 10 or more grams per liter!

That rule 5-10-15 really seems to make sense! (5 gr per liter regular beer, 10 gr/L for IPAs and 15 gr/L for DIPAs).

Dunno...I'm confused...but loved the Aramis hops! And i can't find them now!!!
 
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portguy

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Oh..and i just checked: i bought the Aramis hops a year ago (2014 harvest). Brewed the Aramis Cream Ale in March. All other hops are way fresher...
04/05/2017 00:03:29 Lúpulo Aramis en pellets 2014 - 100 g 3.27 €
 
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portguy

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Damn..i love this beer! I would actually buy it if i didn't make it... Aramis porn it is... (just drinking one of the few last ones)...


 

kh54s10

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I don't think I have yet to hit your 10 gr/L for any of my IPAs. Some have been good others not so much. For me it was more about recipe than quantity of hops. I see that a lot of people dry hop with 170 grams or more. But I haven't.

One of my best IPAs had 78 grams total. Northern Brewer's Chinook IPA.
 

thehaze

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My latest IPA uses 22 gr per liter. I used 17.5 oz hops for 5.5 gallons or 490 gr hops for 21 l. This was all Amarillo and Citra only.
 

kh54s10

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That is a good starting point but too simple for me. Some hops are much more suited for one part of the process than others. Magnum for instance is not very flavorful or aromatic. It is a high AA hop so it is great for bittering but not good for late additions. Some of the flavor/aromatic hops are much more intense than others. Freshness also has an effect.

So learning what each hop does for your beers is necessary. You may need more, you may need less.
 
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portguy

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That is a good starting point but too simple for me. Some hops are much more suited for one part of the process than others. Magnum for instance is not very flavorful or aromatic. It is a high AA hop so it is great for bittering but not good for late additions. Some of the flavor/aromatic hops are much more intense than others. Freshness also has an effect.

So learning what each hop does for your beers is necessary. You may need more, you may need less.
Yes. You are right. But i mean dry hopping with the right (?) hops. High hop oils. Those three beers i brewed are in the "up to" 23 IBU's. And i tried to use appropriate hops for dry hopping....though i think Target would be a surprise when used in dry hopping...Must try it!
 
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portguy

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My latest IPA uses 22 gr per liter. I used 17.5 oz hops for 5.5 gallons or 490 gr hops for 21 l. This was all Amarillo and Citra only.
So...5 grams per liter for a "regular" beer seems legit! I think people are shy when dry hopping and i think (as a newbie that i am) that for under 3-5 grams i see no point in dry hopping a regular Ale. Really don't so far!
 

kh54s10

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IBU and dry hopping are not necessarily related. The majority or bitterness comes from early hop additions. Very little if any bitterness is contributed by dry hopping.

Each hop is different. Citra is a popular dry hop and quite potent, whereas Fuggle is a noble hop for finishing that a lot of people don't like.

They would give very different results and you would probably want to use different amounts of each.

Look up hop substitution charts. Some will say whether the hops are for bittering, finishing or both. It will also give choices of hops that are close to the same.

Unless I am trying to get something exact, I often use the charts to use a hop I already have.
 

kh54s10

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So...5 grams per liter for a "regular" beer seems legit! I think people are shy when dry hopping and i think (as a newbie that i am) that for under 3-5 grams i see no point in dry hopping a regular Ale. Really don't so far!
For a "regular ale", whatever that is, I don't dry hop. If I want some more aroma, I will do a hop stand/whirlpool addition. I will cool the wort to 170 or 150 then add some hops (amount varies) and let them sit for 15 to 20 minutes. This works a little like a dry hop. But a dry hop is also very nice.

I have dry hopped with as little as 28 grams.
 
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portguy

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IBU and dry hopping are not necessarily related. The majority or bitterness comes from early hop additions. Very little if any bitterness is contributed by dry hopping.

Each hop is different. Citra is a popular dry hop and quite potent, whereas Fuggle is a noble hop for finishing that a lot of people don't like.

They would give very different results and you would probably want to use different amounts of each.

Look up hop substitution charts. Some will say whether the hops are for bittering, finishing or both. It will also give choices of hops that are close to the same.

Unless I am trying to get something exact, I often use the charts to use a hop I already have.
Yes. But as you can see i went by the book. Strangely enough the biggest aroma and flavor came from the hops i had laying around and are not that reputable: Aramis.

Amarillo and Saaz (to a degree) are commonly used in dry hopping. But i must be fair: The belgian Saison yeast did its job. Saaz is almost non existent aroma wise. And that is great. I just wasted some Saaz hops.
 

kh54s10

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Yes. But as you can see i went by the book. Strangely enough the biggest aroma and flavor came from the hops i had laying around and are not that reputable: Aramis.

Amarillo and Saaz (to a degree) are commonly used in dry hopping. But i must be fair: The belgian Saison yeast did its job. Saaz is almost non existent aroma wise. And that is great. I just wasted some Saaz hops.
Oh, I don't think you wasted the Saaz. It is an aroma hop. It is not a pungent as others but is a really nice hop for certain styles. It may be just that the recipe and yeast combination are overpowering the hop aroma.
 
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