Drinking my first homebrew!

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DavidSteel

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Just wanted to report in to say that I'm fairly impressed with my first homebrew. It was originally a partial mash oatmeal stout (my only brew I plan to do that is anything other than all grain). This turned out to be a blueberry hazelnut coffee oatmeal stout (with cold brewed coffee and crushed blueberries).

It's only been carbonating for 3 days, but I couldn't resist. I used this 10oz bottle specifically for this purpose of trying this early on and I am damn surprised. Very small head (as expected, it's not done yet lol), a dark brown colour, smells of a strange mix of blueberry tart of hazelnut coffee, goes down super smooth and the flavors actually work with each. Unfortunately, this is one of a kind and I'm drinking the only bottle of it lol. Definitely a good brew, especially for what it is; I surprised myself. Great body, great flavor, and the head (although not completely there) remains constant throughout the brew. This was my own recipe due to me making an effort to save money and experiment. The coffee is a very smooth flavor, yet a bit overpowering (though, that was the emphasis on the flavor so I'm not all that disappointed). All in all, a pretty damn smooth and flavorful staple beer, great to keep pounding. If it aged another week, I know the flavors would work together a little more with each other and it would taste less green. As it currently is, I'd give this a B. If it aged, I'd probably still give it a B, but a slightly higher rating (probably an 86).

I know it's pretty blasphameous to open a brew this early, but I figured with my late (bottle) addition of left over blueberry mash (that I'm using for a 2 gallons of AG oatmeal stout), it would carbonate quicker. Very surprised at how far it got so quickly (I've got experience with carbonating mead, so I'm not too far off). I didn't refrigerate it, and it's still quite tasty; been sitting in a pint glass for a good 10 minutes now and head is still there. Going to wait until 7 days to open my second one and then another 7 days to open the third. I'm trying to push waiting a full 4 weeks before I start putting these babies in the fridge to drink. :mug:

A few general pictures:

Low ABV, so yes- I used 40's. Going to give them an extra week to bottle condition.
 

gtpro

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good to hear! What an exciting time for you, let those sit a while longer and maybe that coffee flavor will mellow out a bit. Dont forget to keep those 40s out of the sun with that clear glass.
 
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DavidSteel

DavidSteel

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good to hear! What an exciting time for you, let those sit a while longer and maybe that coffee flavor will mellow out a bit. Dont forget to keep those 40s out of the sun with that clear glass.
Yeah, they are in an unused and unlit room in my basement, sitting in a corner. Going to let em sit a good 5 weeks.
 
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DavidSteel

DavidSteel

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Opened my second one and it's got a nice head, but no carbonation in the beer yet. Still absolutely delicious (even better than before). The coffee flavor mellowed out. Very satisfying.
 

acyl

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awesome blossom. Congrats on the beer. I freaking love blueberrries and you have my mouth watering. I've debated on some coffee stouts. Did you just add fresh brewed cold coffee to the secondary? How much coffee did you use for what volume of brew?
 
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I know it's tough but seriously keep your grubby paws off them for at least another 2-3 weeks! I remember how disappointed I was when my first beers were finally "ready" and I'd already drank 1/2 the batch. :)
 

maida7

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I'm not sure those 40's with the screw tops are strong enough for carbing with priming sugar.
 
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DavidSteel

DavidSteel

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I'm not sure those 40's with the screw tops are strong enough for carbing with priming sugar.
I've talked to a few people on here that have used 40's with no problems and never had one be a bottle bomb or not carbonate. I understand that they will take longer in the bigger bottles, but seems to be going strong so far. I'll report in if anything happens with them in the next 2-3 weeks.
 

scone

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Just wanted to report in to say that I'm fairly impressed with my first homebrew. It was originally a partial mash oatmeal stout (my only brew I plan to do that is anything other than all grain).
I understand that it's a popular sentiment that moving to all-grain as fast as possible is the thing to do. I'm not trying to criticize your decision (there are many great reasons to do it this way, and it's *your* hobby after all, you do what you want).

Buuut. The way I see it, sticking with partial mashing for a while has a ton of benefits. I was really gung-ho about moving to all grain myself as soon as possible. Then I tasted my first beer and it's kinda good, but it's definitely not "great". There's a ton of room to improve upon it.

My opinion is that if you go all grain before you have your PM technique down pat, you are introduction many more variables into your brew day, and you have many more things to worry about, and thus many more things that can go wrong and mess up your beer. Will you know which one caused things to go awry?

Extract is very consistent batch to batch, it has the right minerals already in it and you can brew from RO or distilled water. You don't have to worry about the mash as much (after all, you are mostly steeping specialty grains for their flavor, and not worrying about the conversion right?). It takes less equipment. Basically, by eliminating a host of all-grain specific issues, you can concentrate on perfecting your beer, and when you are consistently making amazing beers, you can make the jump to all-grain and you will have a good idea of how your beer has changed as a result, and a good idea what variables have caused that change.

Just my two cents. :mug:
 
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DavidSteel

DavidSteel

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I understand that it's a popular sentiment that moving to all-grain as fast as possible is the thing to do. I'm not trying to criticize your decision (there are many great reasons to do it this way, and it's *your* hobby after all, you do what you want).

Buuut. The way I see it, sticking with partial mashing for a while has a ton of benefits. I was really gung-ho about moving to all grain myself as soon as possible. Then I tasted my first beer and it's kinda good, but it's definitely not "great". There's a ton of room to improve upon it.

My opinion is that if you go all grain before you have your PM technique down pat, you are introduction many more variables into your brew day, and you have many more things to worry about, and thus many more things that can go wrong and mess up your beer. Will you know which one caused things to go awry?

Extract is very consistent batch to batch, it has the right minerals already in it and you can brew from RO or distilled water. You don't have to worry about the mash as much (after all, you are mostly steeping specialty grains for their flavor, and not worrying about the conversion right?). It takes less equipment. Basically, by eliminating a host of all-grain specific issues, you can concentrate on perfecting your beer, and when you are consistently making amazing beers, you can make the jump to all-grain and you will have a good idea of how your beer has changed as a result, and a good idea what variables have caused that change.

Just my two cents. :mug:
I researched for a good 3-4 hour every day for 2 months before I even started my first batch. Did 3 AG recipes so far. Did my measurements, hit my temps every time, and got an average of 81% efficiency on each batch. I think AG is more stable than PM because I can control my temperatures better. When I did my PM, I had to heat the water up to keep the temp constant throughout the "mash". With AG, I just calculate my strike temp, dough-in and I have hit my temps every time (pretty impressive!). Same with sparging etc. I know there is always more to learn and I still continue dong "research" every day for a good hour or two, but my first brew (PM) and my second brew (AG) were completely stress free for me and just rolled out. I've done lots of wine in the past, so I'm not completely without experience. But with a good 2 months of good research on my belt, it went by very smoothly. Here's pic's from my PM https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/fi...-only-patrial-mash-brew-then-going-ag-151802/ and a few pics from my back-to-back AG's https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f14/anyone-else-brew-christmas-eve-christmas-day-153541/
 

acyl

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awesome blossom. Congrats on the beer. I freaking love blueberrries and you have my mouth watering. I've debated on some coffee stouts. Did you just add fresh brewed cold coffee to the secondary? How much coffee did you use for what volume of brew?
Just in case you missed the questions I asked....:confused:
 
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DavidSteel

DavidSteel

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awesome blossom. Congrats on the beer. I freaking love blueberrries and you have my mouth watering. I've debated on some coffee stouts. Did you just add fresh brewed cold coffee to the secondary? How much coffee did you use for what volume of brew?
Oh sorry, I did miss this. I added about 3.5ish oz of coffee grounds and cold-brewed it with about 25oz of water for 3 days (for 2.3ish gallons). It's already mellowed out and tastes AMAZING. I've already had the only 2 people who've tried it (2-3 weeks early) wanting to buy all of it lol. It's good stuff, but I'd condense it down to 2.8ish oz for 2 gallons. Adding fresh coffee would probably give it too much acidity, harsh, and over-powering taste (but that's just my opinion). I added 1.5lbs of blueberries per gallon and am going to bottle this weekend. Probably going to add another .5 gallons to balance it out and end up with 2.5 gallons of blueberry oatmeal stout. Should be awesome.
 
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DavidSteel

DavidSteel

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Here is a picture of my hazelnut coffee oatmeal stout that I just poured (I know, I'm so impatient! It's only been 7 days ;_; ).
 
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DavidSteel

DavidSteel

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Oh, and I change my previous statement. The coffee has mellowed out and tastes AMAZING (even though it's only 1 week in). 1.75oz ground coffee beans per gallon is perfect it seems. Also, I forgot to mention that I added the cold-brewed coffee when bottling. Turned out GREAT.
 

jiggs_casey

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I have never been able to hold onto my batches for more than a couple of weeks... :) So tempting...
 
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