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Reverend JC

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Ok, i really hope i do not get any flameing because of this. here goes;

Before the wife and i got married we got a dog. His name is professor flash. Very very good, gentle, obedient dog. When we got married we had made the mistake of telling an old boss that we would have like to have gotten a pure bred (just because). She took that to mean we wanted one, and she breeds Golden Retrievers. Guess what we got for our wedding? yeah, a dog. WTF!!! Coming from my boss i could not refuse it so we took it. Our 4 month old Flash was pretty much done being house broken and with the introduction of lucky, he started crapping on the floor again, both of them. This went on for 2 months and then i decided that since i had grown up with dogs strictly being outside animals that there must have been somthing to that and they became outside animals. We lived on 2 acres surrounded by cornfields. I would let them out when i got home and 2 or 3 hours later hollar for them. They would either be jacking around in the shed or in a near by creek and run back. They were happy, we were happy.

We moved into town going on 2 years ago to an older neighborhood where the old money is. the homes where the yards are not that big. It is fenced but they manage to always make it out and run, cuz thats what they are used too. The problem is i can no longer walk in the neighborhood and hollar for them like i could in the country. They are set in their dead thing rolling in ways to try to move into the house and our 5 year old is not attached to them at all. They are very good dogs for the most part, but i am afraid i am not doing them justice anylonger. I have a guy buying a family farm and would like to take one, but i am having a hard time doing that as i feel like i am giving up on them.

Am i doing the right thing by them finding them homes where they can run like they used too?

I feel like total crap because of it.

Edit: we have tried to train them to be in the house but that was not successful. The reason i bring all this up is our daughter is bugging us for a pet that she can have in the house.
 

the_bird

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If you can find them good homes, where they'll be happy and loved and cared for - that's a good thing. Don't feel bad about this, don't think about this from YOUR perspective, think about what's right for them and what will make them happiest.
 

Orfy

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You will feel much worse than the dogs.
I can't say for sure but I've had 3 rescue dogs now and they never seemed to miss where they came from.

As long as the place they are going to is with an anomal lover then all should be good.
 

cubbies

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Well, let me first say that with enough time and effort, the dogs could be trained. I am not saying that it would be easy, as a matter of fact, it would likely be very difficult and time consuming...but it is possible.

However, as the_bird said as long as you can find them a good home you are not only not doing something bad, but you are doing something good for them. Just for everyones sake, dont be the guy who takes his dog to the pound because "you cant handle it anymore" or whatever. As long as you can find a good, healthy home for the dog, then you have done the right thing.

Then you can get yourself a new pup and begin anew.
 

Short Drive

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Try teaching them to run on a treadmill. Also make sure they get walked. This might help the urge to go running. Also either secure the yard or leash the dogs when they are out. It might take a little more work. But you will enjoy them more. Plus note that this is just an opinion and I might not know what I'm talking about or understand the situation.
 

Bedlam

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If you can talk the other guy into it, I'd see if he wouldn't take both. Dogs live in packs and are happiest when they have doggie pals around. Quite frankly, too, with adult dogs, it isn't really any harder to care for two than it is for one. Offer to cover a vet visit for both, if he'll do this, and take 'em both in for their annual shots and check-up. The biggest fear he may have is that taking two will kill him in vet bills. Also, if they are separated, a lonley bored dog living solo is much more likely to behave badly.

And if they're happy, that matters. Don't feel guilty. I've also had several rescue cases and they don't seem to care. But I've also seen dogs that were pals get separated and go through a hard time. Hard fact to face, but it's true: he'd miss his doggie friend more than he'd miss you.
 

Moonshae

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Dogs are pretty adaptable. They'll adjust to a new living situation, especially if it's the lifestyle they're used to.

If you decide to get a new dog to keep inside, consider the breed and its activity level. You probably wouldn't want a border collie, for example...that would probably be like the dogs you have now. Also consider what you want from the pet. Something like a greyhound that sleeps 20 hours a day isn't going to work even if it is a great inside dog, if your daughter wants to play with it all the time.

Good luck! Giving up a pet for whatever reason is a hard thing to do.
 

MrShake

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Sounds like you and your two dogs could benefit from a basic obedience course and indoor crating. These dogs are only behaving as they have been allowed to, and don't know any better. This is a VERY fixable problem, and the problem lies more with you than with them. Its not a tough problem, its just a problem of a lack of knowledge and experience. All of that can be corrected by going to a basic class.

In terms of the specific problems....

1. Potty Training - Crating is a GREAT aid in potty training. Dogs are, by nature, den animals, and when they are crate trained properly, they view a crate as their home and safe place. They will do everything they can to NOT mess in the crate, and will wait until you get home and let them outside. As an added bonus, if they are in a crate, you know they arn't out loose.

2. Getting out of the yard - Underground fencing is a GREAT way to teach a dog boundaries.

What it really boils down to is that you have to WANT to correct the problem. Giving the dogs away doesn't correct the problem, it just eliminates it. However, if your heart is really not in to fixing the problems, then it is probably best that you find good homes. Shelters will only mean an end to their life.
 

FlyingHorse

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:off: , but just barely...

Who the f#@k gives someone a DOG for a wedding present? Even if you were over there every day ooohing and ahhhing over the dog, your boss (a DOG BREEDER) oughta know that you don't give someone a pet unless you're 100% sure they want it.

Back on topic... it will be hard on you, but you're doing the right thing. And I agree with Bedlam -- see if you can get that guy to take both dogs. Separating the two of them might be harder on them then splitting them from you.
 

TexLaw

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I'm with Bird, Bike, and Bedlam (and not just for the alliteration thing). The dogs will be happier where they can run, and they will be happier together. They grew up together. Yes, dogs can be trained later in life, and they do adapt to new situations, but it does not sound like you want to go through the pain and effort or put them through the same.

And, yeah, a dog is a very generous gift, but it also is a terribly inconsiderate one. A breeder should know better than that!

"Hey, you know how you said you wanted a baby???? Guess what I got you for a wedding present! Go on, guess!"


TL
 

brauhaus

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Bedlam said:
If you can talk the other guy into it, I'd see if he wouldn't take both. Dogs live in packs and are happiest when they have doggie pals around. Quite frankly, too, with adult dogs, it isn't really any harder to care for two than it is for one. Offer to cover a vet visit for both, if he'll do this, and take 'em both in for their annual shots and check-up. The biggest fear he may have is that taking two will kill him in vet bills. Also, if they are separated, a lonley bored dog living solo is much more likely to behave badly.

And if they're happy, that matters. Don't feel guilty. I've also had several rescue cases and they don't seem to care. But I've also seen dogs that were pals get separated and go through a hard time. Hard fact to face, but it's true: he'd miss his doggie friend more than he'd miss you.
+1 to that!

i'd feel worse about separating them, then giving them to a guy with a farm... the dogs will be very happy to be able to run again and being together is key.
 

the_bird

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If it will make you feel better, when you do get another pet for your daughter, adopt it from a shelter. That way you'll know that not only did your two dogs go to a good home, but that you're giving a good home yourself to an animal that needs one.

I mean, I'm not going to sit here and judge anyone, but I personally could never bring myself to buy a dog from a breeder when I *know* how many dogs in this country have to be put down because good homes cannot be found for them. Since my wife and I have been together, we've had four cats and one dog. Two of the cats were found abandoned by the school where she works (one of whom was found cuddling with his dead brother), one of them was a stray kitten that just showed up on our doorstep and climbed on my shoulder, and one cat and the dog were shelter animals.

{off soapbox}
 

Evan!

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the_bird said:
If it will make you feel better, when you do get another pet for your daughter, adopt it from a shelter. That way you'll know that not only did your two dogs go to a good home, but that you're giving a good home yourself to an animal that needs one.

I mean, I'm not going to sit here and judge anyone, but I personally could never bring myself to buy a dog from a breeder when I *know* how many dogs in this country have to be put down because good homes cannot be found for them. Since my wife and I have been together, we've had four cats and one dog. Two of the cats were found abandoned by the school where she works (one of whom was found cuddling with his dead brother), one of them was a stray kitten that just showed up on our doorstep and climbed on my shoulder, and one cat and the dog were shelter animals.

{off soapbox}
I'm 100% with you. We have 2 pure German Shorthair Pointers, both of them rescued. Friends of mine have paid in excess of a grand for purebreed puppies, and it drives me crazy. At my firm, I'm in charge of designing animal shelters, and many times they are public municipal shelters---which means euthanasia and crematory facilities included. I see it firsthand. And it just pisses me off to know that these animals are dying because nobody wants to give them a home, but those same people are willing to pay thousands because a dog is a puppy and is purebred. I'm not trying to pass judgment, because I know certain people are attached to certain breeds...but ethically, it frustrates me.
 
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Reverend JC

Reverend JC

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I agree, Professor Flash came from a shelter and he is everybit as good of a dog as one from a breeder.

Cats and dogs that have been owned by myfamily have all came from there, with the exception of the fine wededing gift:drunk:
 

david_42

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My biggest concern is you are having problems keeping them in the yard. Eventually, they will get hit. Even though rural living has its own set of problems, I'd say move them to the country.
 

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