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Doesn't seem to have that bite...

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Bulls Beers

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I have a few batches of homebrew that i'm drinking. My latest one is a Czech Pils on tap and it's is really good and probably my best yet, but it doesn't have that crisp taste..I just cracked a Weihenstephaner. Man it's just plain GREAT! I know it's the oldest brewery in the world and they have a head start on me, but man it's so good. It has that crisp clean taste..How can I get there?
 

Iordz

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You do brew all grain right? First step, start with a solid malt backbone, use continental pils malt. Don't add any caramel or sweet speciality malts, you only need one malt to make a pilsner: pilsner malt. Next, use authentic continental hops, Halletau, Tettnang or Saaz and make sure they are fresh, that usually means using pellets. Give the beer a firm bitterness, and a touch of aroma/flavor. The most important part of making a great pilsner: fermentation. Pitch plenty, and I mean plenty, of healthy yeast at a cold temperature. It is very important to use liquid yeast of German or Czech origin. Ferment the beer around 50F, keep it nice and cold, this will give the beer a nice smooth character and make it very clean. It is important to reach a low terminal gravity, this will make the beer dry and crisp, refreshing. Make sure to lager for, at least, one month, two would be better, the more patience the better the beer. The beer must have good carbonation to accentuate the dryness and make it taste even crisper.
 
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Bulls Beers

Bulls Beers

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Iordz said:
You do brew all grain right? First step, start with a solid malt backbone, use continental pils malt. Don't add any caramel or sweet speciality malts, you only need one malt to make a pilsner: pilsner malt. Next, use authentic continental hops, Halletau, Tettnang or Saaz and make sure they are fresh, that usually means using pellets. Give the beer a firm bitterness, and a touch of aroma/flavor. The most important part of making a great pilsner: fermentation. Pitch plenty, and I mean plenty, of healthy yeast at a cold temperature. It is very important to use liquid yeast of German or Czech origin. Ferment the beer around 50F, keep it nice and cold, this will give the beer a nice smooth character and make it very clean. It is important to reach a low terminal gravity, this will make the beer dry and crisp, refreshing. Make sure to lager for, at least, one month, two would be better, the more patience the better the beer. The beer must have good carbonation to accentuate the dryness and make it taste even crisper.
This is good. On your points,
I'm doing extract batches at this time.
I'm using Hallertau and Saaz hops for this recipe.
I'm also using a Pilsner Lager Liquid yeast at a temp around 60F.
I think i need to ferment at a colder temp and for a longer period of time. I'm working on getting a lager fridge. It's the Lagering that i have to work on...
 
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