Does brewers' yeast have the same effect in bread?

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eulipion2

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Hello,
An odd notion just hit me, that if, say, a hefeweizen yeast were to be used in bread, would it end up with the banana and clove esters? Would it even ferment at all? Or how about a bread made with Brett?

Just a thought. If anyone's tried this let me know.
 

Soulive

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Its not fermented and the yeast is killed once you bake it. Just a waste of good yeast IMHO...
 
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Soulive...bread is a fermented product - we just don't let the yeast work for long. The act of rising is indeed a short fermentation.

I tried baking with brewer's yeast once, just to see what would happen. It didn't turn out well. I think brewer's yeast is far less aggressive, and my bread barely rose. I also doubt that you'll get much of an ester profile through the baking process.
 

david_42

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You would probably do better by adding beer to your bread and even then many of the esters will be driven off or destroyed.

If you want banana, make banana bread!
 

Danek

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I tried making pizza dough with the yeast cake from my first batch of beer. The dough rose a little bit, but much less than with my usual baker's yeast. There was a pleasant enough flavor to it, but it was less airy than when using regular yeast so I don't think I'll be repeating that experiment.
 

Donasay

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The problem with using beer yeast versus bakers yeast is that beer yeast is active at very specific temperatures, and bread yeast is active at a wide range of temperatures. If you expect your bread to rise with beer yeast, you need to have it sit at the temperature it ferments best at. Also once you raise the temperature of the bread (first few minutes in the oven) the beer yeast will stop working very well. When you raise the temperature of bread yeast (first few minutes in the oven) it starts to go nuts, this is why bread rises very quickly once you put it in the oven... just some stuff to think about... perhaps use brewers yeast for denser breads like bagles or something.
 
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