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Do you have a dry yeast that you like a lot?

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NewBrew75

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I'm a noob, and I'm interested in hearing from those that have used dry yeasts with great results. Any suggestions?
 

sirsloop

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Nottinghams is my go-to yeast for most US/UK brews. Most will probably concur... or call out Safale US-05 as their go-to.
 

Bob

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+2 for Notty. Pretty much my house yeast. I like S-05 in American ales, and S-04 or Windsor in low-gravity English ales. Windsor often gets a bad rap, but I like it.

Cheers!

Bob
 

CBBaron

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I use S-04, US-05 and Nottingham where appropriate.
For clean American style ales US-05 is the best choice. Nearly identical to Wyeast 1056 and WLP001.
For English style ales S-04 is a good yeast with plenty of typical English esters.
Nottingham is more like a dry English Ale. Cleaner and better attentuating than S-04 and therefore good for higher gravity English ales or some American styles. Probably the most versatile dry but in many cases one of the other is a more appropriate yeast.

Craig
 

Yooper

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I use S-04, US-05 and Nottingham where appropriate.
For clean American style ales US-05 is the best choice. Nearly identical to Wyeast 1056 and WLP001.
For English style ales S-04 is a good yeast with plenty of typical English esters.
Nottingham is more like a dry English Ale. Cleaner and better attentuating than S-04 and therefore good for higher gravity English ales or some American styles. Probably the most versatile dry but in many cases one of the other is a more appropriate yeast.

Craig
Me, too. I use nottingham the most, usually, but often use s-05 for the American ales I do. For British styles, I sometimes use Windsor and I like it.
 

maltMonkey

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I very rarely use dry yeast, but I always keep Nottingham on hand. There have been a couple times that I thought I had a yeast that I didn't, or wanted to whip something up on a whim, or the yeast I pitched didn't take. Throw in some Nottingham, problem solved.

It really is a good yeast.
 

9/9

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Agree with the rest. I am still new at this, but I have used Notty for a lot of my beers and haven't had a problem.
 

niquejim

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I use S-05 the most, but I almost always have S-04, S-33, T-58, Nottingham, K-97 and S-189 on hand.
While there are some beers I can't make with these, I can do a majority without having the expense(or the need for a starter) of liquid
 

Buford

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I keep US-05, S-04, and Nottingham in stock. I have tried Windsor, but I didn't like it.
 

mmb

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I'll chime in with the others. I keep packets of Notty, US-05 and S-04 in the fridge along with various dry wine yeasts. Never had a reason to go with liquid as I brew American and English Ales exclusively.

Although I admit I gotta get some WLP500 and WLP550 to play around with.
 

Laughing_Gnome_Invisible

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Since I first used SO-4 I have stuck with it for my English ales. It starts just as quickly as others, and I LOVE the nicely compacted cake it leaves.
 

ohiobrewtus

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I always try to keep 3 or 4 packs of Nottingham around. It's my standard neutral yeast. I also have some Munich and Windsor that I've been playing with and have liked the results thusfar.
 

david_42

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+1 for Nottingham. Ferments dry with very few esters. Good for dark beers, pales and drying out everything else.

I also like S-04 & US-05. Windsor is good for Browns & Milds where you want a sweeter finish.
 

brewt00l

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I'll chime in with the others. I keep packets of Notty, US-05 and S-04 in the fridge along with various dry wine yeasts. Never had a reason to go with liquid as I brew American and English Ales exclusively.

Although I admit I gotta get some WLP500 and WLP550 to play around with.
I kinda thought along the same lines until I really started using some of the more unique liquid strains like Burton, London, English Dry and West Yorkshire. They do give you another palate of colors to paint your flavor profile with so to speak. Brew the same porter with S04 then Burton or West Yorkshire and it's like a whole different beer.

That said I like the Fermentis lineup of US05, S33 and S04 (in that order of preference).
 
OP
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NewBrew75

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I use S-05 the most, but I almost always have S-04, S-33, T-58, Nottingham, K-97 and S-189 on hand.
While there are some beers I can't make with these, I can do a majority without having the expense(or the need for a starter) of liquid
I've looked at the S-33, but have never tried it. The descriptions online that I have found says that it's good for higher gravity and belgian style beers. Many belgian beers rely heavily in the yeast to influence the flavor, does this yeast produce those flavors as well as liquid?
 

Jared311

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I just brewed a batch of smoked porter yesterday with S-04 and it was already fermenting after about three hours. That was my first time using and I am already a huge fan.
 

brewt00l

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I've looked at the S-33, but have never tried it. The descriptions online that I have found says that it's good for higher gravity and belgian style beers. Many belgian beers rely heavily in the yeast to influence the flavor, does this yeast produce those flavors as well as liquid?
No, not at all.

If you search around, you'll find that it is often cited to be the Edme English strain.
 

Reverend JC

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I am using S-04 for the second time currently and the 2 hours from dry pitch to start was amazing. I have been fermenting it on the cool side and the same was done on the first batch.

So far I am very happy with it.
 

niquejim

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I've looked at the S-33, but have never tried it. The descriptions online that I have found says that it's good for higher gravity and belgian style beers. Many belgian beers rely heavily in the yeast to influence the flavor, does this yeast produce those flavors as well as liquid?
No, not at all.

If you search around, you'll find that it is often cited to be the Edme English strain.


Yeah, what he said.
T-58 will make a fair Wit, but 33 is as Belgian as a SNPA;)
 

Rhoobarb

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I had never had good results with dry yeast in the past. I tried some Superior brand dry lager yeast about a year ago and did not like the results. But just a few months ago I did a group brew where Nottingham was specified and I was quite impressed. Quick, vigorous fermentation and a nice, clean profile. I have used it once more since then and now keep several in the fridge for future use and, just in case.;)
 

ajwillys

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I use US-05 about 75% of the time. I do mostly american style beers so it's perfect for me. Nottingham probably gets about 15% and liquids the other 5%. I ONLY use liquid yeast if I'm looking for a very specific yeast profile.
 

cragus

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I've only used 04 and 05. The 04 is pretty impressive with how tight it flocculates to the bottom of the bottles. I made an ESB and didn't have to worry about doing a special pour, just bottoms up like a commercial beer and you don't even see any yeast sliding off the bottom. I'd like to try the Nottingham, but never seen it at my brewstore.
 

BrewinJack

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Nottingham and US-05 for ale and cider... and also for cider (never for beer) i use EC-118... havent had good luck with a few others... but the Nottingham preforms the best by far

cheers
 

BrewDey

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I have to concur that US05 and Nottingham are great for a quick fermentation and a clean finish. This cleanliness is a big plus for most beers-but some folks really like the yeast to have a distinctive flavor profile. If this is the case for you-I'd try Coopers. It has a very distinctive woody/fruitiness that really stands out. I liked it-but doubt if I'll use it again any time soon-as it muted some of the more subtle flavors.
 

bell0347

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I used S-04 in an Irish red and was really impressed with the yeast cake and the clarity in the bottle. Leaves a nice firm sediment on bottle making for an easy pour. I used windsor and was not impressed at all. Fermented crazy but beer was really cloudy and I don't like the taste. Got some blonde ale fermenting right now with Nottingham, we will see how it goes!
 

Endovelico

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I've had fusel caos with S-04 but if you keep it under 22ºC you should be fine
 

FxdGrMind

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I'm way too new at this. But I've brewed with S-04 twice now. Once with a room temp of 61 for the first 4 day's and then up to 69 to finish. The second time in a Heff starting at 68 warming to 71 then back down to finish at 65.
Treating the same yeast differently in the frementation should be enlightening as to it's character.
Good to see that many use S-04 and like it. The question is will I.... =)
Cheers
 
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