Do Tri Clamp Gaskets for 3/4" tube OD with a 1.5" flange exist?

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Jinkies

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Do gaskets for 1.5" Tri Clamp flanges (2" diameter) with a 3/4" bore exist? I see there's a number of 3/4" tube OD with 1.5" flange parts, tees, valves, hose barbs, out there. I'm wondering if the gaskets for these exist. Note, I'm not talking about the standard Tri-Clamp 1/2" or 3/4" with a 1" flange. If not what do you people who use 3/4" x 1.5" TC parts use for a gasket? I'm assuming the answer is just to use 1" gaskets and live with the gap. This is a hot side question for the record and I plan to dissemble between brews. If you have another solution, please let me know. Thanks in advance!

Example parts that could use a 1.5" x 3/4"OD (5/8"ID) gasket when mated to each other:
 

Drumminguy81

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Yes they do exist. I have purchased them from suppliers in china, on ebay, and I even got some from glacier tanks a while back on clearance. Try searching for 19mm sanitary gaskets.
 
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Yes they do exist. I have purchased them from suppliers in china, on ebay, and I even got some from glacier tanks a while back on clearance. Try searching for 19mm sanitary gaskets.
Thanks! I'll keep digging around. Do you use 3/4" fittings with 1.5" flanges currently in your brewery. I was just thinking of going with a mix of 5/8" hose barbs and 1" valves and tees and "living" with the sudden changes in bore size. The consensus seems to be keeping the smallest bore to 1/2" ID is the key and the size jumps aren't that critical. However, poking around in the new hotness of LODO, it seems like "large" fitting size jumps should be avoided as the turbulence can cause some oxygenation. I planned on playing around with some LODO stuff so it seemed liked a smoother wort path was win win.
Thinking of drilling out the 1/2" chugger pump outlet to 5/8" to 3/4" valve to then a 3/4" tee, and 3/4" hose barbs with a 1/2" silicone hose.
Of course I'll end up with a 1/2" tangential return and a 1/2" (actually slightly smaller ID) CFC so that jump seems to be kind of unavoidable. (I know that Brewers hadware has some 1" to 3/4" or 1/2" concentric reducers but I feel like my going overboard may actually have limits).

An aside. I saw you in another post you made you were using the Brewtools steam hat on "normal" kettle. Are you still doing that? How is that going? I've got a Brewers hardware 20 gallon kettle arriving shortly and was going to get the B40 steam hat which should fit as the BH kettle has a 15.75" diameter. Thanks for replying!
 

Drumminguy81

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Yes my system is all hard piped with 3/4 pipe and 1.5"tc fittings. I matched all piping sizes and gaskets and butterfly valves to build a truly sanitary system that can be c.i.p. I special ordered a lot of it from a supplier in china the 19mm butterfly valves were the hardest part to find but they are available for the right price. Hindsight I wish I had gone with all 1" pipe but the outputs on my kettles are only 5/8" so really wouldn't have mattered. My chugger pumps all have welded triclamp heads as well.

I am still using the brewtools steam hat and love it. My boil off has dropped dramatically, I dont worry about boilovers, and hop additions are easy. I dont have it hooked up to a steam condenser though, I just have a 4" pipe that feeds to my exhaust hood.
 
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Jinkies

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Yes my system is all hard piped with 3/4 pipe and 1.5"tc fittings. I matched all piping sizes and gaskets and butterfly valves to build a truly sanitary system that can be c.i.p. I special ordered a lot of it from a supplier in china the 19mm butterfly valves were the hardest part to find but they are available for the right price. Hindsight I wish I had gone with all 1" pipe but the outputs on my kettles are only 5/8" so really wouldn't have mattered. My chugger pumps all have welded triclamp heads as well.

I am still using the brewtools steam hat and love it. My boil off has dropped dramatically, I dont worry about boilovers, and hop additions are easy. I dont have it hooked up to a steam condenser though, I just have a 4" pipe that feeds to my exhaust hood.
Thanks!
Another stalker question. I noticed elsewhere you were using the Stout stainless CFC. Can you do one pass chilling with that? Also do you just mate the 1.5" TC x 3/4"/19mm fittings to that directly or do you use a reducer? I know the flanges are the same from the above conversation. I'm just more curious as to the IDs as the Stout CFC is supposedly 3/8" or less than 1/2" ID.
 

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However, poking around in the new hotness of LODO, it seems like "large" fitting size jumps should be avoided as the turbulence can cause some oxygenation.
You either misunderstood or this is just more LODO nonsense. Turbulence, no matter how strong, is not going to somehow create oxygen out of "thin air". Ok, poor choice of words but you get my drift...
 

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I actually never intended to stock 3/4 sanitary tubes with 1/1.5 flange sizes on them. They were ordered by mistake. I think 3/4 tubing is a fine choice for hard piping but then I really like the smaller profile of the 3/4 TC flanges, clamps and gaskets.
 

Drumminguy81

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Choose the actual dimensions from here. McMaster-Carr

I would think that they are standard 1.5" TC gaskets. The outlet size doesn't matter to the gasket.
Actually it does matter. While yes any 1.5" flange gasket will work, the purpose of triclamp fittings is to be a sanitary fitting for the food industry that does not have to be disassembled to clean. If the gasket i.d. does not match your tube size it will create a void between the flanges allowing liquid and gunk to build up. This wont so much matter if you plan to disassemble every fitting every time to clean. But that can be a lot of added work that can easily be avoided with proper gasket sizing.
 

Drumminguy81

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Thanks!
Another stalker question. I noticed elsewhere you were using the Stout stainless CFC. Can you do one pass chilling with that? Also do you just mate the 1.5" TC x 3/4"/19mm fittings to that directly or do you use a reducer? I know the flanges are the same from the above conversation. I'm just more curious as to the IDs as the Stout CFC is supposedly 3/8" or less than 1/2" ID.
While I have done one pass chilling with the stout chiller, i currently do not. I now have it setup in line to recirculate while i whirlpool and chill at the same time. I generally whirlpool until it chills to about 120* which takes 10 minutes or so for 21 gallons. Then i transfer to fermenter while chilling to pitching temp. It all depends on your flow rate and ground water temperature. I did not use a reducer between my 3/4 pipe and the chiller. The size difference isnt too bad, and I was limited by space due to my hard piping configuration. I do wish the i.d. of thebstout chiller was larger, the small tube restricts my flow quite a bit making it hard to achieve a good whirlpool.
 

jddevinn

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I thought that you could get this configuration on the Mcmaster link I put above, but when I went to configure you cannot.
 
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Jinkies

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Drumminguy81 said:
This wont so much matter if you plan to disassemble every fitting every time to clean
Jinkies said:
I plan to dissemble between brews
That's my current plan but I'm definitely up for the opportunity for CIP. It's part of my justification for Tri Clamps. I want my brew day short and relatively painless so I brew more. Although I currently plan on a quick clean ball valve on the pump outlet so that will probably need to be pulled.
 
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You either misunderstood or this is just more LODO nonsense. Turbulence, no matter how strong, is not going to somehow create oxygen out of "thin air". Ok, poor choice of words but you get my drift...
I could swear I saw it a couple of places but this is the only I can find.
I might be misunderstanding, but LODO – Accidentalis Brewing about six paragraphs down.

Iterative measurements throughout the brewing process revealed that I needed to go all the way through the system and tighten up areas where micro-aeration and turbulence in the pipes, pump, and RIMS tube might occur. Of particular interest, learning to gently underlet the mash during grain in and circulation of the wort during mash, are important to reduce DO uptake. There are some places in the plumbing where air bubbles can gather.
It does make some sense to me. A jump to a tighter diameter probably creates turbulence only. But I could see going from 1/2" or 3/8" to 3/4" or 1" could create a vacuum bubble in the "roll off" area. Clearly I'm not a mechanical engineer here nor an expert in fluid dynamics. I'm not sure how far that could pull air. I would imagine if your fittings weren't tight enough it could do it. Silicone does have a higher gas permeability than other gasket materials but I can't imagine over the couple hours of brewing and mashing that it's enough to be notable. Though those LODO'ers do be rather particular.
 

jddevinn

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It's not that you could pull air into the piping system, but that you could have pockets in the system that never fill with fluid and have an air pocket that was 'always there'.
 
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I actually never intended to stock 3/4 sanitary tubes with 1/1.5 flange sizes on them. They were ordered by mistake. I think 3/4 tubing is a fine choice for hard piping but then I really like the smaller profile of the 3/4 TC flanges, clamps and gaskets.
Bobby, I understand about not wanting to stock the Frankenstein parts. The Kettle I bought has 1.5" TC flanges so that was the determining factor in my search.
 
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I was looking for the gaskets for those connections. I realize 1.5" TC gaskets will make it sealed for liquid purposes, but I was looking for 19mm or 3/4" gaskets that sealed all the way to the bore. Do you carry those?
Sorry we carry only 1.5 or 3/4 T.C seals. I have never seen a seal that seals the entire mating surface to the I.D of tubing.
 

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The ebay ones are cheaper. My experience is that they are all about the same quality wise, unless you buy from someone like rubberfab they all come from china. I keep a lot on hand just in case but have never had a silicone gasket fail. They do stain over time however.
 

Vale71

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The ebay ones are cheaper. My experience is that they are all about the same quality wise, unless you buy from someone like rubberfab they all come from china. I keep a lot on hand just in case but have never had a silicone gasket fail. They do stain over time however.
That's why you should replace them with EPDM gaskets. That and the horrendous oxygen permeabiliy of silicone (and not just oxygen, which is why they stain so easily). There is really no reason at all for employing silicone gaskets in brewing equipment.
 
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