Do thin runnings affect flavor?

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Upstate12866

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2018
Messages
74
Reaction score
44
I have an app with beer recipes called DIY dog. Under the recipe for "77 lager" they include a brewing tip:

"Watch out for collecting too much wort. Collecting too much liquid from run off (under 1008) may impart massive and undesired 'grainy' flavours into the beer."

I've never encountered such a tip, so I was curious if anyone could share some perspective on this. (Reminds me of the myth that squeezing a brew bag will impart bitterness and bad flavors.)
 

kevin58

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2017
Messages
1,042
Reaction score
618
It's actually pretty common advice for fly sparging. The PH can go up at that point as well and produce tannins.
 

day_trippr

Moderna Or Bust! :D
Joined
May 31, 2011
Messages
36,274
Reaction score
18,751
Location
Stow, MA
Right. Strive to keep the "end of runnings" below pH 5.6 and above SG 1.010.
Combined, that will minimize pulling tannins and silicates out of the mash...

Cheers!
 

Dland

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 28, 2018
Messages
1,948
Reaction score
1,013
In practice, my last runnings are seldom below 1.020 & I get pretty good efficiency. If one tastes some 1.010 or even 1.020 wort, one can tell one is not missing that much in the way of sugars or flavor in that range. The 1.010 number seems to me to be more of a commercial brewing set point, where economic factors are the main driving factor.
 

VikeMan

It ain't all burritos and strippers, my friend.
Joined
Aug 24, 2010
Messages
3,488
Reaction score
2,477
Temperature and pH are both factors in tannin extraction. Increase either one and more are extracted. That said, in real life mash scenarios, pH is the more important driver.

Let's not forget... every beer has tannins that come from malt. It's part of what makes beer taste like beer. It's a question of how much is too much.
 
Last edited:

odie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2016
Messages
1,357
Reaction score
559
Location
CC, TX
In practice, my last runnings are seldom below 1.020 & I get pretty good efficiency. If one tastes some 1.010 or even 1.020 wort, one can tell one is not missing that much in the way of sugars or flavor in that range. The 1.010 number seems to me to be more of a commercial brewing set point, where economic factors are the main driving factor.
I'd think the commercial breweries are trying to get down closer to 1.000 squeeze every last penny outta that grain...

well, I guess at some point you are gonna have to boil off excess water, which then eats up the money you saved on squeezing that last drop outta the grain.
 

doug293cz

BIABer, Beer Math Nerd, ePanel Designer, Pilot
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
May 14, 2014
Messages
11,349
Reaction score
7,482
Location
Renton
I'd think the commercial breweries are trying to get down closer to 1.000 squeeze every last penny outta that grain...

well, I guess at some point you are gonna have to boil off excess water, which then eats up the money you saved on squeezing that last drop outta the grain.
Commercial breweries have the option of using hydraulic/pneumatic filter presses to literally squeeze (almost) all of the wort out of the spent grain. They can have apparent grain absorption rates below zero (compared to typical homebrew rates of 0.04 - 0.12 gal/lb.) If you don't know the difference between "apparent" and "true" absorption, then negative absorption won't make any sense to you.

Brew on :mug:
 

VikeMan

It ain't all burritos and strippers, my friend.
Joined
Aug 24, 2010
Messages
3,488
Reaction score
2,477
If you don't know the difference between "apparent" and "true" absorption, then negative absorption won't make any sense to you.
Don't sugarcoat this. I mean, I'm sure the explanation is sweet.
 

odie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2016
Messages
1,357
Reaction score
559
Location
CC, TX
Commercial breweries have the option of using hydraulic/pneumatic filter presses to literally squeeze (almost) all of the wort out of the spent grain.
I saw a wine making grape press at a flea market last year. Looked unused. I shoulda grabbed it. I was looking at it and thinking "bag squeezer"...probably would have been 50 bucks well spent...
 
Top