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Do I still need to aerate the wort when using a starter?

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reshp1

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I'm sure this has been asked before but search is only coming up with aeration of the starter.

The question is do I still need to aerate the wort (as much?) when pitching a starter? From what I understand the the oxygen is for the yeast to use to multiply, but if I'm using a starter, there will be much less multiplying before the yeast reach critical mass and start the attenuation phase right? Would that mean it's much easier to over-aerate and leave dissolved oxygen in the wort/beer that will later cause oxidation?
 

mr x

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Personally, I aerate as much as is possible for an hour on a stir plate before pitching. When the starter is done, I let it settle and decant the wort.
 

Revvy

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mr x said:
Personally, I aerate as much as is possible for an hour on a stir plate before pitching. When the starter is done, I let it settle and decant the wort.
Are you saying you aerate the entire 5 gallons of Wort on a stirplate?

Wow, you must use a huge one.

In answer to the question...you should always aerate the wort. Boiling the wort takes the oxygen out of it. SO you want to reintroduce as much as possible into it to give the yeasties lots of incentive to work.
 

Blender

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mr x said:
Personally, I aerate as much as is possible for an hour on a stir plate before pitching. When the starter is done, I let it settle and decant the wort.
I believe he is talking about the 5 gallons of wort.
I would aerate it, you won't hurt anything.
 

Bobby_M

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If you've built the starter up to a huge colony, it's likely not absolutely necessary unless you want to further grow the colony after pitching. In a low gravity wort, it won't really matter. You'll just create a longer lag time. In a high gravity wort, I'd still aerate the wort. You want the yeast to multiply.

Oxygen is to yeast as wine is to humans. It makes them feel like reproducing.
 

Beerthoven

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The question is do I still need to aerate the wort (as much?) when pitching a starter?
Yes, aerate the wort. The yeast need a couple generations to adapt to the wort.

From what I understand the the oxygen is for the yeast to use to multiply, but if I'm using a starter, there will be much less multiplying before the yeast reach critical mass and start the attenuation phase right?
Even with a starter there will a lot of yeast replication going on so you need the O2.

Would that mean it's much easier to over-aerate and leave dissolved oxygen in the wort/beer that will later cause oxidation?
Its nearly impossible for a homebrewer to over oxygenate. Any O2 not used by the yeast during replication is forced out during fermentation.
 

mr x

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Blender said:
I believe he is talking about the 5 gallons of wort.
I would aerate it, you won't hurt anything.
When I read that question, I thought he meant do you aerate the starter wort.

As far as the full 5 gallon batch goes, I aerate like crazy with a wine degassing wand. I usually get about 3-4 inches of foam in my carboy from doing this.
 
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