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Do I NEED to do a starter when I go all grain?

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Tankard

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I like the simple "rehydrating dry yeast" procedure, and I'm not really looking forward to doing a starter. Anyway I can get around it or do I have to do this when I go all grain?
 

BarleyWater

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AG makes no diiference when it comes to the yeast except maybe a little more aeration needed. so, Yes.
 

ShortSnoutBrewing

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A starter takes maybe 20mins. It's not a big deal and to me worth the "effort". All you do is boil some water and DME. Cool it down, pour into a bottle of some sort, pitch yeast, shake and let it go to work.
 

cubbies

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A starter has nothing to do with how you produce your wort. It is just a way for the yeast to get their reproducing done prior to being introduced to your wort. You are likely using dry yeast. If you continue to use dry yeast, you will not need to worry about starters. However, if you want to get into the world of liquid yeast (and you will need to if you want to do specialty brews), then you are going to need to make starters whether you are doing AG or extract.

However, there is nothing to fear, it could not be easier. 3/4 cup DME dissolved into 2 cups of boiling water. Continue to boil for 10 minutes. Cool to room temp, pitch yeast and then let it do it's thing.
 
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1)You never make a starter when you use dry yeast.
2)Once wort is in the kettle for the boil, nothing is really any different process-wise.
3)Starters are preferred when using liquid yeast.
4)If you prefer good beer than you should try to use preferred methods.
5)Everyone has broken a few rules from time-to-time.
 

BrewDey

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While AG or extract makes no difference-after a few tasty brews with starters-I am fully in favor of them. I'm pretty sure that they have made the difference between OK beer with a few funky flavors-and very good beer with no off-flavors.
 

blacklab

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I have done many beers, both AG and otherwise, without making a starter, using liquid yeast. Doing so is preferred, but not necessary. If I have time, I will defnitely make a starter. However, as I have a four year old and an 11 mo. old, my brew sessions are often last minute and not planned in advance.

Regardless of technique(AG,extract), your beer will ferment faster and you'll have less chance of infection if you pitch a starter.
 

Jamo99

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A 5 gallon batch is a 5 gallon batch, whether AG or extract. I irrationally feared making a starter at first, but now I look forward to it. The difference in lag time, fermenation, and finished product vs no starter is pretty obvious. Of course, if there's a dry yeast that I like for the style I'm making, I go dry yeast all the way.

If doing a 5 gallon AG batch though, you'll be doing a full boil and the ice bath method to cool down your wort will take a lot longer. You'll want to invest in a wort chiller if moving to all grain.
 

brewt00l

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1)You never make a starter when you use dry yeast.
2)Once wort is in the kettle for the boil, nothing is really any different process-wise.
3)Starters are preferred when using liquid yeast.
4)If you prefer good beer than you should try to use preferred methods.
5)Everyone has broken a few rules from time-to-time.

Woah...way too much common sense for one post. Twenty minute time out for you sir.
 

ScrewyBrewer

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Making a starter is also important when the yeast your pitching has been washed from a previous batch of beer and stored for awhile. I figure on a 10% per month loss of viable cells from my stored yeast and always make a starter well in advance of my planned brewday.

It's easy for me to add a cup of extra light DME to 2 liters of water to get the 1.030 -1.040 gravity wort needed to make my starters, so I've never felt I had to use wort from an all grain batch of beer for that.
 
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