Do I need to boil immediately?

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

DesignatedDecoy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2013
Messages
98
Reaction score
2
I'm trying to get my ducks in a row to take the all-grain plunge, but 1 question:

Do i need to boil immediately after I mash out or can I wait a day? In other words, it it okay if, after mashing out, the wort naturally gets down to room temp (w/o a wort chiller), and then I boil the next day?
 

geoffey

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2011
Messages
1,439
Reaction score
510
Location
Minneapolis
You can wait a day, but pasteurize that sweet wort before you let it cool. And make sure the lid gets put on and stays on.

I just did this method last weekend. Mashed on Friday and boiled Sat.


Sent from my iPhone using Home Brew
 

wilserbrewer

BIAB Expert Tailor
HBT Sponsor
Joined
May 25, 2007
Messages
11,261
Reaction score
2,842
Location
New Jersey
You can wait a day, but pasteurize that sweet wort before you let it cool. And make sure the lid gets put on and stays on.

I just did this method last weekend. Mashed on Friday and boiled Sat.


Sent from my iPhone using Home Brew

Plus one, after collecting all your wort, I would heat it to 180 degrees and place the lid on the kettle...that should buy you a day....maybe two who knows....sooner the better I would guess.



Wilserbrewer
Http://biabbags.webs.com/
 

wtaylor3

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2013
Messages
707
Reaction score
101
I was also curious about this as I have a heavy 7 day work schedule right now and am having trouble fitting in a 6+ hour brew day
 

jtratcliff

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
2,038
Reaction score
958
Location
Pasadena
but don't skip the mashout at 180+ for 15 minutes or so... It does 2 things, it denatures the enzymes so your wort doesn't continue to change, and it pasteurizes it to kill any critters that might get a foothold before your yeast is introduced.
 

wtaylor3

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2013
Messages
707
Reaction score
101
I do BIAB....I should mashout AFTER removing the grain, correct?
 

mikescooling

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2012
Messages
2,033
Reaction score
277
Location
Chicago
You can do it but their is a risk. Once you make that sugar water, there's a possibility of something else you don't want growing in there, you may be OK too. It's a gamble. IMHO I would wait till I could do the mash and boil in the same day. Lots of threads going on how to cheat time.
 

MrFeltimo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2013
Messages
1,077
Reaction score
49
Location
Easton
most of my brews are done over 2 days, mash and drain on a saturday night and boil on the sunday morning, most of the time i dont even bother putting a lid on the kettle. i have never had any problems.
 

RM-MN

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Nov 26, 2010
Messages
14,638
Reaction score
5,446
Location
Solway
I was also curious about this as I have a heavy 7 day work schedule right now and am having trouble fitting in a 6+ hour brew day
Fine, quit doing a 6+ hour brew day. I can do a BIAB (small batch, 2 1/2 gallons. my stove takes more time to heat a bigger batch) in just a little over 2 hours from start to finish. You may not want to cut it that fine because to do that requires a very short mash and no-chill but even with a full 5 gallon batch, 60 minute mash, 60 minute boil, and chilling by putting my pot into a tub of ice water I can be done and everything cleaned and put away in about 3 1/2 hours. If you are BIAB and still taking 6 hours, find ways to cut that time. if your grain is milled fine, try a 30 minute mash or maybe even a 20 minute mash. I've done several of those with excellent results and I'm experimenting with a 10 minute mash. Do you really need a 60 minute boil? I don't know but it's been reported that 90% of the bittering is done in 30 minutes. I've done a few 45 minute boils with good results because with no-chill the wort remains hot enough to gain bittering after the heat is turned off.
 

judsonp

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2013
Messages
164
Reaction score
24
Location
Ithaca
Mash-out in the mash tun to sterilize doesn't make a lot of sense. If you're going to wait between mashing and boiling, get the wort into your kettle, raise that to 180 F, put the lid on, and leave it. It may not be ideal, but it should be fine.
 

benm1024

Active Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2013
Messages
37
Reaction score
3
Location
San Francisco
I do this pretty often. Mash at night then brew then boil the next morning. I raise my temp up to 180 like mentioned above, then just keep the lid on and let it sit. The best beer I've made came from doing this so I don't think it hurts at all.
 

NickTheGreat

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2012
Messages
1,209
Reaction score
409
I think the OP is confused. I bet you could wait to boil until the next day. But the only reason you cool with a chiller is to get the temp down after the boil. And that's to get down to temp where your yeast can do it's thing.

Which is your last step in brewing.
 

cobrem

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2013
Messages
116
Reaction score
12
Location
Rockland
Echoing what everyone else is saying... Get it up to pasteurization range. The grains are covered with lactobacillus and probably other stuff. Kill them with heat up front. If you are going to do the boil more than one day later, I'd try to chill it after pasteurizing - if you can get it to fridge temp, it will help keep bugs from growing rapidly.
 

jwelch1103

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jun 12, 2008
Messages
365
Reaction score
83
Location
Wilmington
I too do this often, mash in the evening, heat the wort to 180 degrees, put a lid on the kettle then shut everything down. Wake up early the next morning and start the boil. Works out fine but I've only ever let 8-12 hours elapse between shutdown and restart.
I usually do this on a Friday or Saturday evening but a couple times have done it on week nights and still get to work the next morning by 8!
 

Latest posts

Top