Do I have bottle bombs waiting to happen...

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OldWorld

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I let the fermentation go for one month. I bottled...This is my very first batch. I certainly taste some other wild stuff growing. I don't mind the taste :)

After only one day I opened a bottle and gave it a little shake to see what would happen. To my surprise I've got bubbles.

Should I move them to a cooler environment? Or keep the box taped shut and hope for the best?
 

alpo

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After a month in the fermenter, they are probably ok. But, you should really get a hydrometer so you can start measuring the gravity and know for sure. How long have they been bottled?
 

Whisler85

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after the gentle agitation of bottling, a good majority of the carbonation that takes place happens in the first week or so

that being said, bubbles after one day sounds scary- and if your fermentation temp was too low, theres a good chance that the batch didnt attenuate properly

USE A HYDROMETER
 

fratermus

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To my surprise I've got bubbles.

Should I move them to a cooler environment? Or keep the box taped shut and hope for the best?
The bubbles might be outgassing from CO2 produced during the primary.

If you are worried you can put them in a bombshelter:
 

beersydoesit

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I agree with fratermus. Put them in a bomb shelter and relax. I asked nearly the same question, was it only a month ago?
You don't specify how many bubbles. If it is just a few, I wouldn't worry.
But I use a plastic bin out of habit anyway.

Also use a hydrometer.
 

ArcaneXor

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After only one day I opened a bottle and gave it a little shake to see what would happen. To my surprise I've got bubbles.
I wouldn't suggest agitating bottles during the conditioning phase, unless you like ER visits to have glass shards removed from your body and your severed fingers sewn back on. Even a normally carbonated beer can shatter a bottle when you shake it up.

It's not unusual to have bottles appear overcarbonated within the first week of bottling, because they are warm and the yeast are actively producing CO2, which is slow to dissolve back into the liquid at ambient temperatures. Just to be safe, put the bottles in a bomb shelter at room temperature, wait three weeks, and then see where you are at. If you get any bombs in the meantime, either throw the batch out or put it in the fridge while wearing a full set of safety gear (eye protection, gloves, etc). If you don't, you'll still want to be careful and refrigerate them until you know for sure whether or not they are overcarbonated.

And... USE A HYDROMETER in future batches. The things cost less than 10 bucks and can save you a lot of guesswork, frustration and injuries.
 

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