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Do hops grow in Texas?

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MESmith

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I was wondering my dad has 60 acres of land near College Station (central Texas) If they do does it take years to get product? and can you get various types?
 

Brakeman_Brewing

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There are a few good threads concerning hop growing if you do a search of this forum, there are variables in growing hops and usually it takes 1-2 seasons to yield a nice crop.
 

clemson55

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Thats zone 8 I believe zone 7 is supposed to be the limit, also that area is really arid isn't it? You would need to irrigate them for sure which could get pretty pricey.
 

david_42

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Hop geneticist Al Haunold on growing hops in S. Texas.

Latitude 31 degrees is a bit out of the normal ecological range for hops. It is the daylength rather than the temperature, the latter could be overcome with sufficient watering (drip irrigation should work fine). As far as the direction and location of plants goes, it does not seem to matter too much.

The daylength during the critical months of rapid growth (from early May to mid-June could be supplemented with a simple 100 watt bulb, say setting the timer to go on about 8 PM until midnight, that would help. After mid-June it does not matter anymore. Also, hops should not be trained too early, even if growth has appeared and is quite vigorous. That should be pruned back, and new growth retrained not earlier than the first week of May.

Cascade would be about as good a choice as any, but it would produce some sterile male flowers at such latitudes, I have seen that in northern Mexico (Monterey area), but it still produced good cone set. Perhaps Nugget, or Brewers Gold, but I have no experience with those in southern latitudes. Willamette or Kent Goldings probably are a no, but one would have to experiment.
 

Poindexter

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Great, a grow light in the back yard from 8P to midnight for 6 weeks. The neighbors will love that.
 
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MESmith

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College Station is not really arid, we are about 100 miles east of Austin and 100 miles NW of Houston. Spring is usually wet and some time in the end of may to June it starts to dry out until September. However the temps can get into the low 100s in August. We do grow wine grapes here. Iragation would not be an issue, very easy to do on a small scale. the daylight issue I assume you mean the longer day in the northern latitudes?
 

DaleJ

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Hops usually do best between the 35th and 45th latitude. But people in Florida have success with them.

The very wet weather may be an issue for you. They like/need plenty of water, but they can't sit in it. Best for them to be in well drained, loamy soil.

Get 2 or 3 rhizomes and give it a try. That's the best way to tell.
 

EvilTOJ

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EdWort grew a good crop of hops last year, and he's in Texas somewhere. So it's definitely possible, if maybe a little outside the hop plants comfort zone.
 
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MESmith

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Hell no! Only two things grow in Texas! Steers and.. and something else.. what was it now?
Well my dad has a few steers, but that other thing must be in a different part of Texas, where they eat vegamite ;)

Sparky thanks for the link, might try a few this spring just for grins, and back up. Cascades and Mt Hood I'm thinking.
 

wh4tig0t

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What about in more arid West Texas / Eastern New Mexico (the high plains ~4200 MSL)? I guess as previously stated its not so much the humidity, but the day length. What about altitude? Where can i read more about the day lengths required, and what are the zones mentioned?
 
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Hop geneticist Al Haunold on growing hops in S. Texas.

Latitude 31 degrees is a bit out of the normal ecological range for hops. It is the daylength rather than the temperature, the latter could be overcome with sufficient watering (drip irrigation should work fine). As far as the direction and location of plants goes, it does not seem to matter too much.

The daylength during the critical months of rapid growth (from early May to mid-June could be supplemented with a simple 100 watt bulb, say setting the timer to go on about 8 PM until midnight, that would help. After mid-June it does not matter anymore. Also, hops should not be trained too early, even if growth has appeared and is quite vigorous. That should be pruned back, and new growth retrained not earlier than the first week of May.

Cascade would be about as good a choice as any, but it would produce some sterile male flowers at such latitudes, I have seen that in northern Mexico (Monterey area), but it still produced good cone set. Perhaps Nugget, or Brewers Gold, but I have no experience with those in southern latitudes. Willamette or Kent Goldings probably are a no, but one would have to experiment.

DAY LENGTH... omg duh. I was wondering why my cascade started making cones in april-may...
 
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