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Do different yeasts need different volumes of priming sugar?

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I can't believe the answer to the above question is yes. I am asking it because I am going over my brew notes and have seen that when i have primed with 6.8 grams/litre of beer with WLP 001 the beer has come out nicely fizzy - just how i like a beer to be: properly fizzy, but not enough to make you feel like you are drinking sherbet.

Whereas i primed with 6.8g/l with a beer made with WLP530 and it came out way too fizzy.

The 001 was made in summer and the 530 in autumn, which i thought may explain the difference.

However, the batch the above 530 came from was split in half, and I used WLP001 in the other half. I primed with 6.5g/L and it is significantly less fizzy.
 

m00ps

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Short answer: No. Corn sugar / dextrose and cane sugar are supposed to be 100% fermentable by any saccharomyces yeast strain. Couple questions though

How long did you leave each of the above batches to ferment?

What sort of priming sugar did you use?

Are you batch or bottle priming?
 

mattdee1

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I do a lot of split batches, so I’ve got a fair bit of experience using two different yeasts on the same wort with the same amount of bottling sugar. Sometimes one will carb up faster than the other, but they generally both land in a place where I can’t detect any difference in carbonation.

One exception, I split a batch between Nottingham and Windsor on a higher gravity beer, and the Windsor version ended up being notably more fizzy. I’m not convinced that is due to the yeast, though; I think I may have rushed the process a bit and bottled the Windsor batch before it was completely fermented. No bottle bombs or gushers, thankfully.
 

kh54s10

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I don't think it has much to do with the yeast but it is due to the style. You might want a fizzy pale ale but a not so fizzy stout.
 
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A couple things to think about.
FG. Was the beer in the 2nd batch done? or was there still a little fermentables left?
If your doing a side by side yeast vs yeast then 1 yeast may start early and finish early. 1 may be still chomping along.
OG is beer 1 a light low OG beer? If beer 1 is light and beer 2 is heavy then the carb is going to be different, same side if there is more residual sugar in the beer then carbonating will be different if looking at a side by side.
That's the long answer. The short answer is every beer is going to be a little different based on OG, FG, ABV, time, temp and residual sugar. Just my experience....

Cheers
Jay
 

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I think the answer you're looking for is found via a different question: will the level of attenuation change the amount of priming sugar to use? Or something like that...
 

beergolf

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My guess is that the 530 batch was not completely done when you bottled it.

530 is famous for that. It will start of like crazy and get to the point that you think it is done. Fools you. You botttle and it knocks off a few more points.

The only super carbed beers I have had were using that yeast. now when I use that yeast I make sure to give it plenty of time to make sure it is done.
 

SeraW

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My guess is that the 530 batch was not completely done when you bottled it.

530 is famous for that. It will start of like crazy and get to the point that you think it is done. Fools you. You botttle and it knocks off a few more points.

The only super carbed beers I have had were using that yeast. now when I use that yeast I make sure to give it plenty of time to make sure it is done.
This happened to me, too...same strain.
 

pdxal

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My guess is that the 530 batch was not completely done when you bottled it.

530 is famous for that. It will start of like crazy and get to the point that you think it is done. Fools you. You botttle and it knocks off a few more points.

The only super carbed beers I have had were using that yeast. now when I use that yeast I make sure to give it plenty of time to make sure it is done.
+1
It also likes to be warmed up to finish.
 

dyqik

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My guess is that the 530 batch was not completely done when you bottled it.

530 is famous for that. It will start of like crazy and get to the point that you think it is done. Fools you. You botttle and it knocks off a few more points.

The only super carbed beers I have had were using that yeast. now when I use that yeast I make sure to give it plenty of time to make sure it is done.
WLP002 will do that as well. There's a thread about it somewhere around here...
 
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My guess is that the 530 batch was not completely done when you bottled it.

530 is famous for that. It will start of like crazy and get to the point that you think it is done. Fools you. You botttle and it knocks off a few more points.
Thanks. I think this is the problem. I measured the FG using a refractrometer a few times and it was stable. However, it was a bit higher than the batch with the 001 - and it is a relatively light beer so no reason for the difference.

I will keep this in mind as i definitely want to use that yeast plenty more times.
 

pdxal

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You can also measure the FG again, after letting a bottle go flat to determine if the gravity is lower than it was at bottling. If it is, it wasn't finished. I hope you're using a refractometer correction after fermentation to determine gravity and alcohol, though you don't need it to determine if fermentation is finished...:)
 

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Would either recipe happen to be near the alcohol tolerance of either strain?
 
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Would either recipe happen to be near the alcohol tolerance of either strain?
No, the highest ABV of any of the beers was about 6.7% which is way lower than the tolerance of both yeasts. The batch that i split came out at 4.6%.

You can also measure the FG again, after letting a bottle go flat to determine if the gravity is lower than it was at bottling. If it is, it wasn't finished. I hope you're using a refractometer correction after fermentation to determine gravity and alcohol, though you don't need it to determine if fermentation is finished...
If the beer is 8% and higher i will double check with the hydrometer, otherwise I am just happy to know the FG is terminal. I think there is a really small margin of error if the ABV is 6% or lower...and I am not too fussed if I say the beer is x% when in fact it is x-0.5% ... I am not selling it.
 

pdxal

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No, the highest ABV of any of the beers was about 6.7% which is way lower than the tolerance of both yeasts. The batch that i split came out at 4.6%.



If the beer is 8% and higher i will double check with the hydrometer, otherwise I am just happy to know the FG is terminal. I think there is a really small margin of error if the ABV is 6% or lower...and I am not too fussed if I say the beer is x% when in fact it is x-0.5% ... I am not selling it.
Not worried about abv. Lower gravity tban at bottling tells you that there was additional fermentation in the bottle and you bottled too early.
 

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