DIPA to cold crash or not to cold crash?

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timrox1212

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So searching around the internet I get conflicting ideas on cold crashing and dry hopping. What is my best bet? Cold crash, then dry hop cold? Dry hop warm, then cold crash? Cold crash, then warm it back up, then dry hop? Or none of these?


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The542

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I dry hop at 68* just after ferm ends and let sit for five days then cold crash. I want the cold crash to bring any hop bits still floating around to the bottom.
 

CanAusBrewer

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I vote for cold crash, then dry hop after allowing it to warm up again, then cold crash again.
 

theciderkid

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I dry hop in the keg using a mesh bag then I transfer to another keg and drink, no air ever touches it and you don't lose any aroma


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Calichusetts

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I'd vote for skipping the dry hop. You're adding extra time to the beer before you can drink it. Your kettle/flameout/whirlpool addition are fading more and more. Also, many great DIPAs are hazy so if you can live with it, skip it.

I've had great results both ways (crashing after I dry hopped) so do whatever you feel.
 

MotoGP1000

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I dry hop in the keg using a mesh bag then I transfer to another keg and drink, no air ever touches itSent from my iPhone using Home Brew

Hoping your still on this site... but how did your transfer from one keg to another? And do you carbonate your conditioning keg before transferring to a serving keg?
 

Day-Day

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Not sure what style of DIPA you are brewing, but I know a lot of people making hazing IPA's are still doing one early dry hop during active fermentation, then cold crashing for a few days, then warming back up while dry hopping again, then another cold crash to drop out the hop particles.

The idea is to get some bio-transformation with the first dry hop.

Then drop out the yeast (1st cold crash).

Second dry hop to get the good oils in the beer (and hopefully not stuck to the yeast).

Another crash to drop out the hop particles.

Of course the idea is that oils stick to the yeast and both the yeast and hop oils drop out during a cold crash. By dropping the yeast (cold crash, or with a conical) then dry hopping again, you don't lose so much of the good stuff, in theory.

I'm personally going to try this method next IPA I make, whether it's hazy or not.
 

Dgallo

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Do you have a way to minimize suck back when cold crashing. If not, you should should see if there is anyway to hook your regulator gasline to your airlock or bung. Then yes. Absolutely cold crash. As @CanAusBrewer mentioned, it’s actually a great ideal to drop your yeast out of suspension first and soft or cold crash for 24-36 hours. Then warm back up to room temp and Dryhop. Then cold crash again after 3 days and keg
 

MotoGP1000

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Do you have a way to minimize suck back when cold crashing. If not, you should should see if there is anyway to hook your regulator gasline to your airlock or bung. Then yes. Absolutely cold crash. As @CanAusBrewer mentioned, it’s actually a great ideal to drop your yeast out of suspension first and soft or cold crash for 24-36 hours. Then warm back up to room temp and Dryhop. Then cold crash again after 3 days and keg

Can you expand on using the regular and tank for cold crash? Assuming you keep a constant pressure in the vessel during cold crash?
 

Dgallo

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Can you expand on using the regular and tank for cold crash? Assuming you keep a constant pressure in the vessel during cold crash?
If I’m being redundant or explaining something you already know I apologize. When your beer cools during the cold crashing, the molecules in the beer and the air in the headspace will constricted which causes negative pressure or a vacuum which causes air (oxygen) to rush in through the airlock to equalize the pressure change. This will exponentially increase your risk of oxidation. By having a gas line running from your co2 tank to your fermenter and setting your regulator to 2psi(that’s all you need) when the vacuum is created it will kick om your regulator and only fill the headspace with co2 to equalize the pressure instead of oxygen
 

bobeer

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Probably in the minority here but I don't do anything fancy and the beer has always turned out great. I just ferment the beer all the way until it's finished, cold crash, and dry hop in the keg for 1-2 weeks while it's carbonating and conditioning. Then I tap it like normal. The first pour is usually cloudy but after that it's fine and the dry hop aromas and flavors are still there for the life of the keg- usually 2-6 weeks.

If I'm bottling the batch I dry hop while it's cold crashing and I bottle the beer cold.There's always enough yeast racked over to naturally carbonate the beer.
 

MotoGP1000

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If I’m being redundant or explaining something you already know I apologize. When your beer cools during the cold crashing, the molecules in the beer and the air in the headspace will constricted which causes negative pressure or a vacuum which causes air (oxygen) to rush in through the airlock to equalize the pressure change. This will exponentially increase your risk of oxidation. By having a gas line running from your co2 tank to your fermenter and setting your regulator to 2psi(that’s all you need) when the vacuum is created it will kick om your regulator and only fill the headspace with co2 to equalize the pressure instead of oxygen
Exactly what I needed to know! I will do those same. Again reason for me doing this is to get rid of that nasty neipa hop burn
 

Dgallo

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Exactly what I needed to know! I will do those same. Again reason for me doing this is to get rid of that nasty neipa hop burn
That will help but dryhoping during fermentation is what most of the hop burn. Fermentation binds proteins in the wort to polyphenols which causes them to stay in suspension longer. Excess polyphenols is what give hop burn
 

moreb33rplz

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My last couple of IPA/DIPA I've fermented in a keg, put dry hops in a mesh bag in the same keg at room temp after fermentation, and then cold crashed, carbed, and served from the same keg. I get a half pint of yeast slurry and then nothing but glorious hoppy beer.
 

MotoGP1000

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My last couple of IPA/DIPA I've fermented in a keg, put dry hops in a mesh bag in the same keg at room temp after fermentation, and then cold crashed, carbed, and served from the same keg. I get a half pint of yeast slurry and then nothing but glorious hoppy beer.
I’ve only been able to ever minimize the hop burn with baggin the hops. But my utilization stinks. I just brewed today. Loose hop pellets for the boil/hopstand. Will bag the dry hops as I normally do but definitely cold crashing in a conditioning keg
 

Dgallo

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I’ve only been able to ever minimize the hop burn with baggin the hops. But my utilization stinks. I just brewed today. Loose hop pellets for the boil/hopstand. Will bag the dry hops as I normally do but definitely cold crashing in a conditioning keg
Don’t bag, there’s really no sense if you’re not keg hopping. If it’s in a FV, raw dawg those bastard$
 

Day-Day

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The NEIPA in my sig, I used a bag for the hops on the hot side, then dry hopped right in the carboy (no bag, etc.) I did two separate dry hop additions (day 3 and day 5) cold crashed on day 10 and kegged on day 12. The first pour was perfect... no hop particles, no yeast sludge, and no hop burn. The first week in the keg it was slightly bitter for a NEIPA but tasted like grapefruit juice. By week 2 some of the bitterness subsided and now it's perfect. I don't do anything special when cold crashing... I just leave the airlock on and cover it with a paper towel soaked in sanitizer... never had any issues... that I know of.
 

MotoGP1000

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Don’t bag, there’s really no sense if you’re not keg hopping. If it’s in a FV, raw dawg those bastard$
Dgallo- This might be a question with an obvious question and possibly repeating something already said. But here goes — shouldnt my kegged beer essentially be “cold crashing” itself just being in the serving vessel and fridge? As stated I’m still getting awful hop burn but I would think that would solve for itself after a few pours leaving the rest of the keg spot on
 

MotoGP1000

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Dgallo- This might be a question with an obvious question and possibly repeating something already said. But here goes — shouldnt my kegged beer essentially be “cold crashing” itself just being in the serving vessel and fridge? As stated I’m still getting awful hop burn but I would think that would solve for itself after a few pours leaving the rest of the keg spot on
Question with and obvious answer*. I should proof read
 

Dgallo

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Dgallo- This might be a question with an obvious question and possibly repeating something already said. But here goes — shouldnt my kegged beer essentially be “cold crashing” itself just being in the serving vessel and fridge? As stated I’m still getting awful hop burn but I would think that would solve for itself after a few pours leaving the rest of the keg spot on
Hop burn Takes 2-3 weeks usually for it to disappear, sometimes more. You can minimize this by not dryhoping during fermentation. That being said hop creep is a real phenomenon, the enzymes in hops can actually break down complex sugars and cause a secondary fermentation so that why people are trying to crash before dryhoping to leave a greatly reduced amount of yeast in suspension so when the hop creep occurs the yeast will bind less proteins with polyohenols (what hopburn actually is). Also yeast will strip some hop oils when they crash out after dryhoping

So yes kegging and putting it in the fridge will cold crash in theory, but more yeast and hop particles will make its way into your keg and lines and has the potential to clog diptubes and poppets.

This past beer I just kegged last week uses 14oz of hops in total for a 5 gallon batch, 9 of which were in the dryhop split 3 days to kegging and the second with 18 hours left using galaxy and Nelson, hops known for polyphenols and hop burn. Using the process of crashing and dryhoping I explained previously, it has absolutely zero hop burn and the aroma jumps out of the glass.
C94250AE-ED2F-4A9D-B798-F24E3D536C22.jpeg
 

MotoGP1000

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Hop burn Takes 2-3 weeks usually for it to disappear, sometimes more. You can minimize this by not dryhoping during fermentation. That being said hop creep is a real phenomenon, the enzymes in hops can actually break down complex sugars and cause a secondary fermentation so that why people are trying to crash before dryhoping to leave a greatly reduced amount of yeast in suspension so when the hop creep occurs the yeast will bind less proteins with polyohenols (what hopburn actually is). Also yeast will strip some hop oils when they crash out after dryhoping

So yes kegging and putting it in the fridge will cold crash in theory, but more yeast and hop particles will make its way into your keg and lines and has the potential to clog diptubes and poppets.

This past beer I just kegged last week uses 14oz of hops in total for a 5 gallon batch, 9 of which were in the dryhop split 3 days to kegging and the second with 18 hours left using galaxy and Nelson, hops known for polyphenols and hop burn. Using the process of crashing and dryhoping I explained previously, it has absolutely zero hop burn and the aroma jumps out of the glass. View attachment 652174
we should brew sometime. Lol. That looks really good! Curious. Your time table from fermenter to keg. I like to use 1318 yeast which is pretty fast and furious so I tend to keg on day 5 or 6 when doing a NEIPA. Traditional iPas I will normally wait out 2 weeks. Are you fairly quick to keg as well? Reading your timetable described above it sounds like it
 

Dgallo

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we should brew sometime. Lol. That looks really good! Curious. Your time table from fermenter to keg. I like to use 1318 yeast which is pretty fast and furious so I tend to keg on day 5 or 6 when doing a NEIPA. Traditional iPas I will normally wait out 2 weeks. Are you fairly quick to keg as well? Reading your timetable described above it sounds like it
I’m about 10-11 days grain to glass with most ale yeast, except for kvieks. I’ll push them to 7 days. Always give typical yeast 2/3 days to clean up at 70-72*f when they hit fg.
 

MotoGP1000

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I’m about 10-11 days grain to glass with most ale yeast, except for kvieks. I’ll push them to 7 days. Always give typical yeast 2/3 days to clean up at 70-72*f when they hit fg.
awesome. Thanks for all the wonderful information. Just brewed another today

Golden Promise
Honey malt
White wheat

mosaic hops 2oz. 10min
Mosaic 2oz 5 min
Amarillo 3oz hopstand
Enigma 3oz hopstand.

planning on 3oz Enigma dry hop maybe

really went into this one with no plan. Just experimenting with ways to have a better final product
 

MotoGP1000

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I’m about 10-11 days grain to glass with most ale yeast, except for kvieks. I’ll push them to 7 days. Always give typical yeast 2/3 days to clean up at 70-72*f when they hit fg.

Update: Beer was put in a conditioning keg and cold crashed for 24hours. Initial tasting was decent. Not as hop burny as I have been getting. Note: lactose was added 5 min left in the boil.

after 24 hour cold crash noticed some yeast/hop residue at the bottom of the conditioning keg once pushed to serving keg. Full glass pour tonight. Didn’t detect any hop burn. Smooth creamy and sweet with a little bitter (not burn) at the end.

oh... also added some vanilla in the conditioning keg. I think the lactose and vanilla obviously help but the cold crash was definitely a winner here. Something I need to continue to do every time with this style
 

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