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Diluting fermented wort

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jeansberg

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I bottled my first beer a couple of days ago and just boiled my second wort. I underestimated the amount of evaporation and ended up with a considerably smaller volume than expected.

Is it possible to dilute the wort after fermentation is done? Is there a maximum dilution percentage? I was thinking about diluting 3.6 liters to max 5 liters. That would increase the volume by almost 40 %.
 

Flyin' Lion

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If you plan on diluting your wort, you need to know the original gravity of what you boiled. If your boiled wort is at your predicted O.G., then I would suggest not diluting and just appreciate the smaller volume that you have. If, however, your O.G. is high, then you could dilute down to your predicted O.G. level.

I would dilute prior to fermentation, that tends to be the procedure when doing partial boils.

Is this a kit, partial boil, all-grain. More information might provide better responses than what I've given you.:mug:
 
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jeansberg

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This was an extract boil with some steeped crystal malt. Boil volume was 4 liters (really all my pot can safely handle. That was added to 2 liters already in the bucket.

I pitched the yeast, checked the scale on the side of the bucket, and it was at 3.6 liters. The hydrometer was broken so I have no OG. I have a predicted one from Beersmith, though.
 

Flyin' Lion

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If you just boiled off too much volume, then I'd say your good to add some water, but if you're going to do this after fermentation, then I'd pull a sample and then see if you really want to dilute it. Some of the best beer comes from making mistakes.:mug:
 
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jeansberg

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That's a very good point. I set out to make a different beer from my first one, without buying a lot of new ingredients, and this will definitely be different. :) Of course, it will also run out much faster.
 
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