Different yeasts for an IPA

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Beersnob16

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I'm going to be making a 5 gallon batch of an IPA and splitting it up into 5 1 gallon fermenters and use different yeast in all 5. I have used us-05 in this recipe before and it was good but I would like to experiment and see what the difference is, any suggestions are welcome. Thanks


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boydster

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If you can control fermentation temps down to 59-60° for the first few days, try Nottingham. It's really clean at low temps.
 

khawk95

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I really like wyeast northwest ale. Slightly fruity at higher temps, but clean at cooler temps.


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stpug

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I'll put in a nod for Ringwood 1187 working for fruit-juicy IPAs, but you don't want to mash overly high.
 

BrewDawg79

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Vermont IPA yeast GY054 by GigaYeast is a pretty good one. Just did an IIPA with it and results are awesome.
 

Yooper

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My favorite yeast for an American IPA is WLP001, but I like Wyeast 1335 (Surly is said to use that one) almost just as much and it has worked out great for me.
 

Black Island Brewer

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I've been using WLP090 San Diego Super Yeast in my IPAs & IIPA with outstanding results!
I second this. This yeast works fast and clean, then drops clear. As per usual keep an eye on ferm temps and pitch rates.
I'll third this. I have been very happy with the speed, attenuation, and low esters of this yeast. Really lets the hops shine through.
 

j1n

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I'm going to be trying a Mangrove Jack m44 West Coast ale yeast in my next IPA.
 

seabass07

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I really like wyeast northwest ale. Slightly fruity at higher temps, but clean at cooler temps.


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This is my favorite for pale ales and IPA's. It gives a really clean subtle fruit character in the mid 60's. It just has a unique character that is great for hop forward beers. But don't listen to wyeast when they say it's a high flocculating yeast. It behaves like a hefe strain. I hit FG after 3 days. On day 10 after 2 days of coldcrashing, it still looked like yellowish milk and had a creamy krausen hanging out.
 

khawk95

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This is my favorite for pale ales and IPA's. It gives a really clean subtle fruit character in the mid 60's. It just has a unique character that is great for hop forward beers. But don't listen to wyeast when they say it's a high flocculating yeast. It behaves like a hefe strain. I hit FG after 3 days. On day 10 after 2 days of coldcrashing, it still looked like yellowish milk and had a creamy krausen hanging out.


I agree. It takes a long time for the krausen to fall/ beer to clear.


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urbanmyth

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My go to yeast for American and English ales is WLP007 Dry English. Depending on my mash temp and ferment temps, I can get 80% attenuation out of it, with esters that mesh really well with most hoppy beers.

Best part is it flocs like a rock and gives me clear beer within 4 days of being under gas.
 

Broham1

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I've been very happy with the following:
US-05
Nottingham
Northwest Ale
Denny's Favorite
Ringwood
Burton IPA
 

JonM

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I use 1272 for all my IPAs and have been really happy with the results.


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masonsjax

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I make IPAs using several different yeasts that I've been really happy with:
Pacman
Conan
Brett B Trois
Kolsch

All of these are very different, but all make great hoppy beers.
 

kingwood-kid

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Do you want to find your favorite neutral American IPA yeast or to have five different beers? If it's the former, then Nottingham, Denny's Favorite, etc will be fine, although not monumentally different from US05. You might not be able to discern a difference in a blind triangle tasting between a few of these.

If you want five different beers, then don't be afraid to use English and Belgian yeasts (I don't consider 007/1098 especially English when fermented cool). I've made good American-style IPAs with WY1028, Wy1318, WL006, WL550 and WL530, as well as hoppy saisons.
 

zwiller

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I'll put in a nod for Ringwood 1187 working for fruit-juicy IPAs, but you don't want to mash overly high.

Care to expound? Recently tried WLP007 and much prefer it over Chico but looking to bump the esters up a notch. Chico "works" but is kinda blah to me now. Used it for a long time... Too long.
 

Hello

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I've used mangrove jack's M44 and it was good. Next I'll use WLP090. Big fan of Denny's Fav 50 but have only used it in a fruit beer.
 

DarthCitra

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I make IPAs using several different yeasts that I've been really happy with:
Pacman
Conan
Brett B Trois
Kolsch

All of these are very different, but all make great hoppy beers.

Do i have to dedicate a fermenter if i use a Brett Trois?
 

StonesBally

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I use 1272 for all my IPAs and have been really happy with the results.


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This is my favorite yeast for IPA and pretty much any American ale style. I've side by side tested it against 1450 and 1056. I think it's flavor melds well with American hoppy beer profiles.
 

masonsjax

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Do i have to dedicate a fermenter if i use a Brett Trois?

Nope! Brett is just yeast and can be treated like any other. True it is capable of eating more than sacc yeast and can change the character of a beer post primary, so some attention to sanitation is in order. It's not like bacteria though, which is a much smaller organism, capable of hiding in the tiniest of nooks and coming back to haunt you. I use dedicated carboys for bacteria laden beers, but for brett, you're fine.

Brett acts differently depending on whether it's used as a primary yeast or blended with another yeast or added after primary. When used by itself, it ferments out quickly similar to other brewers yeasts that you're used to. Big starters are recommended when it's used as primary. Think lager pitching rates. This particular strain of brett is very good as a primary strain, very fruity and great for IPAs.
 

rmyurick

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Stone reportedly uses something similar to 1098/WLP007, but you want to keep it cool (low-mid 60s) unless you want some esters.

I think Great Lakes uses Wy1028 in most of it's flagship ales. Definitely a dry beer results, some woody or nutty notes.

Personally, I love Wy1469, W. Yorkshire, but you're going to get lots of English character. Pear notes early, but it fades with age to kind of a nutty flavor.
 

urbanmyth

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Just as a follow up to my suggestion of WLP007, I took a hydro sample of the IPA I brewed on June 28th the other day: 1.012. This was down from 1.070. Roughly 83% AA. Nice and crisp.
 

Goolsbymd

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I boring I guess. I just use plain ole 001, heard 090 is very similar but I got plenty of time.
 

VikingChrisColby

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It's hard to beat White Labs WLP001, Wyeast 1056, Fermentis Safale US-05, or any other "Chico"-derived strain, for American IPAs -- they do exactly what they're supposed to for that style of beer. And, they decrease the amount of hop bitterness during fermentation less than most yeast strains.

http://beerandwinejournal.com/yeast-strains-ibus/


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stpug

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I have used us-05 in this recipe before and it was good but I would like to experiment and see what the difference is, any suggestions are welcome.

It's all right there in the OP.

But FWIW, give WY1056 a shot - it's a great IPA yeast :rolleyes: :drunk:
 

masonsjax

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A few years ago I abandoned Chico in favor of Pacman. It attenuates slightly more and leaves a slight hint of mineral rather than the light peach note you can get from Chico under certain conditions.
 

skw

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Given that BRY-97 is named West Coast, it isn't anyone's favorite for an IPA?
 
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