Different colour beer from same bottle

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Nevoja

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I wanted to taste a Dubbel that finished 3 weeks of bottle conditioning and sat in the fridge for 24 hours.
I poured from one bottle into two glasses and the first one (top layer of the bottle; glass on the right) came out nicely amberish, while the second one (the glass on the left) was more golden (much lighter in colour). This lighter beer was around 1/3 of the bottles volume.
So the top layer of the beer was darker than the bottom layer, in one 0,3l bottle.
IMG_9507.JPG


Has anybody seen something like this before?
Does anybody have an idea how this is possible?
 
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Nevoja

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More likely stirred into suspension at the bottom when you poured.
So it did not yet pack-up nicely on the bottom? I pitched 1g of T 58 for conditioning. T 58 was also the yeast for fermenting.
 

VikeMan

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So it did not yet pack-up nicely on the bottom? I pitched 1g of T 58 for conditioning. T 58 was also the yeast for fermenting.
I'm not really familiar with the T-58 strain, but in my experience, most yeast strains can get stirred up pretty easily, even if they have fully settled. That first little (or big) "glug" at the beginning of the pour reaches the (now perpendicular) bottom and starts the process.

There's this idea that if you pour carefully and leave <insert inches or centimeters of beer here> un-poured, that all the yeast will stay in the bottle. While this can minimize the yeast poured, I've yet to see it truly eliminate it.
 
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Nevoja

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I'm not really familiar with the T-58 strain, but in my experience, most yeast strains can get stirred up pretty easily, even if they have fully settled. That first little (or big) "glug" at the beginning of the pour reaches the (now perpendicular) bottom and starts the process.

There's this idea that if you pour carefully and leave <insert inches or centimeters of beer here> un-poured, that all the yeast will stay in the bottle. While this can minimize the yeast poured, I've yet to see it truly eliminate it.
Thanks for the explanation, I will try to pour more gently next time and see if I can get the same coloured beer from the whole bottle ;)
 

BrewZer

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I'm not really familiar with the T-58 strain, but in my experience, most yeast strains can get stirred up pretty easily, even if they have fully settled. That first little (or big) "glug" at the beginning of the pour reaches the (now perpendicular) bottom and starts the process.

There's this idea that if you pour carefully and leave <insert inches or centimeters of beer here> un-poured, that all the yeast will stay in the bottle. While this can minimize the yeast poured, I've yet to see it truly eliminate it.
What brew-kind needs is a beer bottle siphon that will pull beer from just above the yeast layer without disturbing it.

All you engineers out there --- there's your challenge!
 

Toxxyc

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Thanks for the explanation, I will try to pour more gently next time and see if I can get the same coloured beer from the whole bottle ;)
It won't matter much. You can pour the first glass as carefully as you wish, but when you lift up the bottle to move to the next glass, the sloshing back disturbs the yeast cake and will affect the look. That's why you always pour slowly, evenly and in one go when you pour a bottle conditioned beer.
 

VikeMan

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That's why you always pour slowly, evenly and in one go when you pour a bottle conditioned beer.
And even then, the beer that comes out toward the end will have more yeast in it than the first ounces, because physics.
 

hotbeer

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It's going to get stirred up by the bubbles too no matter how careful you are to not disturb it. I try to do one complete pour without stopping.

Though I wonder if the results you are seeing might be a sign of bottling before the ferment was really complete.
 
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Nevoja

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Though I wonder if the results you are seeing might be a sign of bottling before the ferment was really complete.
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I doubt that, because it sat in fermentation for 24 day's going from 1.062 to 1.01 giving me 83% of attenuation.
 
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