Didn't Know I Needed a Two-Stage Fermentation.

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NathanYearout

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Hello, as the title says. I was following a recipe from beersmith. I don't use beersmith typically and I'm new and neglected to click on the fermentation part. I didn't know I needed to transfer the batch to a new carboy to finish the fermentation, and also didn't see that it says "age 30 days." I don't know if they mean keeping it in the fridge or something along those lines as I plan to keg the beer. Will my beer have any off flavors? I'm making a blue moon clone, I'm not too concerned with it tasting identical though. It's my second batch so I more just want something decent. Thanks.
 

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RM-MN

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1. You don't need a second stage. Your beer will do just fine in one fermenter.
2. A Blue Moon clone doesn't need a 30 day aging. Aging is for dark and high alcohol beers. They will benefit from that. Blue Moon will be ready to keg in about 10 days. It wouldn't be that long but that will let a lot of the trub settle. If you were in a hurry you could keg it at day 7 but you would get a lot of sediment in the bottom of your keg. Better to leave the sediment in the fermenter.
 
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NathanYearout

NathanYearout

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1. You don't need a second stage. Your beer will do just fine in one fermenter.
2. A Blue Moon clone doesn't need a 30 day aging. Aging is for dark and high alcohol beers. They will benefit from that. Blue Moon will be ready to keg in about 10 days. It wouldn't be that long but that will let a lot of the trub settle. If you were in a hurry you could keg it at day 7 but you would get a lot of sediment in the bottom of your keg. Better to leave the sediment in the fermenter.
That's what I thought, don't know why the recipe said that. Maybe just a mistake as I believe wheat beers go bad quicker than most.
Glad to hear it though, thanks for the help.
 

PCABrewing

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1. You don't need a second stage. Your beer will do just fine in one fermenter.
2. A Blue Moon clone doesn't need a 30 day aging. Aging is for dark and high alcohol beers. They will benefit from that. Blue Moon will be ready to keg in about 10 days. It wouldn't be that long but that will let a lot of the trub settle. If you were in a hurry you could keg it at day 7 but you would get a lot of sediment in the bottom of your keg. Better to leave the sediment in the fermenter.
I think that "age for 30 days" may be standard language. Did you use the "Brew Steps" instructions?
 
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NathanYearout

NathanYearout

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I think that "age for 30 days" may be standard language. Did you use the "Brew Steps" instructions?
Yes, but it wasn't detailed at all. It was just how to boil the batch it didn't even include how to add any of the other ingredients like Correander and orange peel and such. I did my best though and I think it's turning out fine. Though now I'm hoping the other instructions beer Smith had were correct.
 

PCABrewing

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Yes, but it wasn't detailed at all. It was just how to boil the batch it didn't even include how to add any of the other ingredients like Correander and orange peel and such. I did my best though and I think it's turning out fine. Though now I'm hoping the other instructions beer Smith had were correct.
But that's where you saw the thirty days statement right??
I asked because I looked at about ten different recipes in my library and they all said that.

It will be fine, DWRAHAHB
 
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NathanYearout

NathanYearout

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But that's where you saw the thirty days statement right??
I asked because I looked at about ten different recipes in my library and they all said that.

It will be fine, DWRAHAHB
Aha. I see what you mean. Thought they were specialized instructions the recipe author included.
 

PCABrewing

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Aha. I see what you mean. Thought they were specialized instructions the recipe author included.
Yeah its a shame theyre not more consistent.
I just looked at the one called "Beersmiths Wit" and it does list the Corriander and Orange Peel in the Boil Ingredients section.
 

wepeeler

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A lot of recipes, especially kits, have not updated the recipe in years. Most will say transfer to secondary, but as @RM-MN said, everything can and should be done in primary, especially for your recipe.

Secondary transfers only introduce oxygen which will speed up the breakdown of the freshness and shelf life of your beer.
 
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NathanYearout

NathanYearout

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Yeah its a shame theyre not more consistent.
I just looked at the one called "Beersmiths Wit" and it does list the Corriander and Orange Peel in the Boil Ingredients section.
I switched to Brew Father because they have a really well fleshed out app and interface on Android and my PC. They seem to do a great job. Brewsmith definetely has some great recipes but the UI is very outdated in my opinion.
 
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NathanYearout

NathanYearout

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A lot of recipes, especially kits, have not updated the recipe in years. Most will say transfer to secondary, but as @RM-MN said, everything can and should be done in primary, especially for your recipe.

Secondary transfers only introduce oxygen which will speed up the breakdown of the freshness and shelf life of your beer.
Makes sense. Thanks for the help guys.
 

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I switched to Brew Father because they have a really well fleshed out app and interface on Android and my PC. They seem to do a great job. Brewsmith definetely has some great recipes but the UI is very outdated in my opinion.
I've been using BeerSmith since around 2011/12. I prefer to have it installed on my laptop for use. With my recipes created there, I've noticed things change when I put them into the 'cloud' folder. Annoying thing like strike temperatures changing (going up most of the time by up to a few degrees F). Even if I make sure it's all correct with the recipe in that folder, on the app, going to the web site brings up a changed temperature. IMO, it should be the same between the two methods.

I might give Brew Father a shot. One ding against them is no actual native install on computers. I print out the recipe and use that on brew day. I also put the printout (with any brew day notes on it) right there where the fermenter is. I also don't want my recipes out in the cloud for anyone to get a hold of. I didn't see anything on the BF site that mentions being able to make your recipes/items "private".
 
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NathanYearout

NathanYearout

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I've been using BeerSmith since around 2011/12. I prefer to have it installed on my laptop for use. With my recipes created there, I've noticed things change when I put them into the 'cloud' folder. Annoying thing like strike temperatures changing (going up most of the time by up to a few degrees F). Even if I make sure it's all correct with the recipe in that folder, on the app, going to the web site brings up a changed temperature. IMO, it should be the same between the two methods.

I might give Brew Father a shot. One ding against them is no actual native install on computers. I print out the recipe and use that on brew day. I also put the printout (with any brew day notes on it) right there where the fermenter is. I also don't want my recipes out in the cloud for anyone to get a hold of. I didn't see anything on the BF site that mentions being able to make your recipes/items "private".
There's an option in the recipes to change them from private to public or vise versa. And yeah, it seems more directed towards people on their phones. It's a plus for me since I like having my recipes on my phone and with me while I'm buying the ingredients but it does suck they don't have a dedicated PC program. I think overall it's worth a shot.
 

Golddiggie

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There's an option in the recipes to change them from private to public or vise versa. And yeah, it seems more directed towards people on their phones. It's a plus for me since I like having my recipes on my phone and with me while I'm buying the ingredients but it does suck they don't have a dedicated PC program. I think overall it's worth a shot.
I buy my ingredients either by the sack, 5# or 10# increments so that I have enough for several recipes. The LHBS I visit isn't that far away. But, when I go, I make sure it's not just for a single recipe. Well, unless it's a yeast that's going to be for just one (typically getting that a week ahead).

I only use a handful of malts in my recipes. Makes it easier to track inventory (which BS does). I've also broken most of the malts into either one or two pound bags (vacuum packed). Again, makes it easier on brew day when the recipe calls for even pound increments of the additional malts and I can just grab it. I did break out the flaked barley into half pound bags. ;) Base malt is in sealed drums/buckets (gamma lids on the buckets).
 

wepeeler

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I've been using BeerSmith since around 2011/12. I prefer to have it installed on my laptop for use. With my recipes created there, I've noticed things change when I put them into the 'cloud' folder. Annoying thing like strike temperatures changing (going up most of the time by up to a few degrees F). Even if I make sure it's all correct with the recipe in that folder, on the app, going to the web site brings up a changed temperature. IMO, it should be the same between the two methods.

I might give Brew Father a shot. One ding against them is no actual native install on computers. I print out the recipe and use that on brew day. I also put the printout (with any brew day notes on it) right there where the fermenter is. I also don't want my recipes out in the cloud for anyone to get a hold of. I didn't see anything on the BF site that mentions being able to make your recipes/items "private".
I used Beersmith exclusively until I tried Brewer's Friend 9 months ago. As long as you enter in your system as accurately as possible, it's damn reliable. On a smartphone either in a browser or as an app. I haven't tried the app, but I've checked my phone a few times when I didn't have my laptop handy.
 

Oleson M.D.

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Correct, the idea of "two stage" fermentation is something that died (or should have) years ago. We always do the entire ferment in a single vessel, start to finish.

Aging? Yes, we have some Barleywines and Imperial Stouts (10.5% ABV) that have been aging since March, 2021.
Our German Pils only ages as long as it takes to completely clear, and to carbonate (in kegs). Normally 4 to 6 days. Fresh is best.
 

Steveruch

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Some brewers have had freshness issues with high adjunct beers, especially flaked oats and flaked wheat. I've heard that from a few actual breweries.
I haven't heard that, but I'll gladly admit there are a lot of things I haven't heard.
Could it be more that it's because of them being high adjunct beers? I wonder just how fresh the adjuncts were and if using malted wheat would have been a better idea.
 

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I’m newish to brewing and have still been using extract kits for the past year. I have a kit I’m planning on making soon that is a tripel Belgium and it says it requires 3 months in a secondary stage. From what you mentioned above is that dated and I should keep it in primary the entire time?
 

wepeeler

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I haven't heard that, but I'll gladly admit there are a lot of things I haven't heard.
Could it be more that it's because of them being high adjunct beers? I wonder just how fresh the adjuncts were and if using malted wheat would have been a better idea.
Not 100% sure, but I know a lot of neipas used to be made with flaked oats and wheat, and a lot of brewers have gotten away from that. Most likely for shelf life, since the market is over-saturated. Plus, the amount of hops they use for the style doesn't do shelf life any favors.
 

Bobo1898

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I have a kit I’m planning on making soon that is a tripel Belgium and it says it requires 3 months in a secondary stage. From what you mentioned above is that dated and I should keep it in primary the entire time?

A tripel needs to age due to the high alcohol content as @RM-MN stated. Two to three months of aging seems about right for this---ABV above 8 or 9%. Belgian beers in particular will age nicely. That being said, though, I wouldn't age an IPA at that high an ABV because hop aroma and flavor can drop fast.

Whether you should stay in primary or not, is up to you. I wouldn't stay in primary more than a month, in order to get it off the yeast. You probably could avoid secondary and package the tripel and let it condition in the bottle, or the keg, for the remainder of the aging period. You may have more sediment in the bottle than if you used a secondary vessel, but for this beer style, I wouldn't shy away from it.

I agree with most people saying avoid secondary, if you can, due to potential oxygen exposure if you can't do a closed transfer. I avoid secondary for most all beers except for lagers and higher ABV beers. Even then, I'm performing a closed transfer into a keg and aging it.
 
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