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Did i rack my brew too early

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KLAAYHAUS

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I found this link while reading other threads on here and I think I may have racked my first brew too early.

http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter8-4.html

Brewers Best IPA
Brewed on 2/6/10
OG 1.061

There was no fermentation by 2/8 (nottingham dry yeast), so I used White Labs English Ale Yeast and started to see air 15 hours later.
I let this go until the airlock was bubbling once every 40 to 60 seconds and placed in a 6 gal glass secondary on 2/14 with a FG of 2.0 @ 68 deg F. I didn't strain the wort before transferring into the primary so there was a lot of sediment (approx 1.5 inches worth).

Since racking, I have seen nothing from the airlock.

Questions

1.) If I transferred too early, should I add more yeast and try to start this again.

2.) Should this secondary be in a cool dark place
 

Bheher

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Yeah the I think you have the wrong FG. But anyway your going to want to leave your beer in the primary until fermentation has stopped. This means pretty much no bubbles in the air lock.

Dont add more yeast, if you fremented for 6 days you will be fine.

Yes store the secondary in pretty much the same place your primay was. About 65 degrees and dark is best.
 

goose1873

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I'm assuming your FG is 1.02...this does happen frequently. Notty yeast should not stall there like some other yeastys though :confused: Make sure you are in the temp range (59-70) and that your airlock is secure. I would give it a swirl and check gravity every other day for 4 days...If it doesn't change then ur safe to bottle/keg. I'd leave it 4 another week either way...maybe 2
 

PatMac

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The final gravity (FG) should be lower than the original or starting gravity (OG or SG).

You probably did transfer a little bit too early if there was still airlock activity. While I'll reinforce that the airlock should not be used to assess fermentation, if it's bubbling - fermentation is most likely still taking place.

If it already fermented for six days you should have caught it on the tail end and be okay.

Generally you want to take a hydrometer reading about two weeks after you pitch and then again three or so days after that. If the reading is the same, the fermentation is done and you are okay to move to secondary if you want to.

Take note that racking to secondary is not mandatory by any means. A lot of people leave their beers in the primary for a few weeks and then bottle. Secondary is often used to add extra flavors, clear the beer, or let the beer mature.

If you transferred all of the sludge with it, you'll probably get some active yeast that will complete the fermentation if it wasn't already done before you transfered. If you leave it in there for two weeks or so all of that stuff will settle back down to the bottom and will be filtered out when you bottle.

Don't pitch more yeast.

Store the secondary in a pitch black area if possible and between 63-67 degrees if possible.

I'd also recommend you read Palmer's "How to Brew" book. It's a great book and helps spell a lot of this out into simple terms.
 

jiggs_casey

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I don't understand how your FG would be higher after fermentation but, if you fermented from 2/9 to 2/14, you should be fine. I wouldn't use the airlock as a guide to 'completion of fermentation' either. Once your hydrometer is 'stuck' at the same reading for a few days, you can call it good...

As far as your questions, no, don't pitch anymore yeast and yes, store your secondary in a dark cool place...
 

l1ranger

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. I didn't strain the wort before transferring into the primary so there was a lot of sediment (approx 1.5 inches worth).
how did you transfer to the secondary?

otherwise as noted above, if you do secondary, you don't transfer until after fermentation is complete.
 
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KLAAYHAUS

KLAAYHAUS

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Thank you all for your advice, I will not add more yeast. I moved the carboy into my closet which is dark and about 68 degrees (coldest place I have in the apartment). Below is a picture of my hydrometer with the maroon line representing where my FG reading was. I am probably not reading it correctly. Is it 1.2 or 1.02? I am not sure where I got 2.0 from, when I looked again it's more likely that it's 1.2.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

 

K-Man

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I wouldn't use the airlock as a guide to 'completion of fermentation' either. Once your hydrometer is 'stuck' at the same reading for a few days, you can call it good
I am new and my very first brew is in the primary now for 5 days as of noon today.

What I have observed is that illuminating the container with a flashlight reveals that tiny bubbles are constantly being generated in the wort, which rises to the top, creates foamy constellations on the surface, and at intervals of maybe twice a minute my airlock gurgles out a subtly flatulate aroma.

So as to the quote above, can't we say that fermentation can be considered complete when I no longer see the generation of these tiny bubbles anymore? My instincts are telling me to go off that as the indicator.

I welcome your knowledge and experience, anyone that cares to comment.

Nick
 

kryolla

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I am new and my very first brew is in the primary now for 5 days as of noon today.

What I have observed is that illuminating the container with a flashlight reveals that tiny bubbles are constantly being generated in the wort, which rises to the top, creates foamy constellations on the surface, and at intervals of maybe twice a minute my airlock gurgles out a subtly flatulate aroma.

So as to the quote above, can't we say that fermentation can be considered complete when I no longer see the generation of these tiny bubbles anymore? My instincts are telling me to go off that as the indicator.

I welcome your knowledge and experience, anyone that cares to comment.

Nick
Fermentation is complete when the gravity reading is stable over 2-3 days. You also need to add some time for yeast to clean up after themselves couple of days. Those bubbles are just Co2 escaping
 

K-Man

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Fermentation is complete when the gravity reading is stable over 2-3 days. You also need to add some time for yeast to clean up after themselves couple of days. Those bubbles are just Co2 escaping
Thanks, Kryolla! Can I ask a followup on this on? The part about the yeast cleaning up after themselves, I didn't get that. Is that why the scummy tan colored *algae pond* (not real algae, just being descriptive here) on top of my wort is receding and actually looking cleaner than before? I just assumed it was because I decreased the temp in the area I have this in by about 3 degrees, down to 70, and that it slowed the process down, but now you got my mind on this.

Thanks again

Nick
 

kryolla

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Thanks, Kryolla! Can I ask a followup on this on? The part about the yeast cleaning up after themselves, I didn't get that. Is that why the scummy tan colored *algae pond* (not real algae, just being descriptive here) on top of my wort is receding and actually looking cleaner than before? I just assumed it was because I decreased the temp in the area I have this in by about 3 degrees, down to 70, and that it slowed the process down, but now you got my mind on this.

Thanks again

Nick
In the process of yeast multiplying they produce byproducts such as diacetyl and when primary fermentation is complete they go into cleanup mode. The cleaner look is due to yeast dropping out when fermentation is over
 

HomerJR

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While the yeast are consuming the sugars and producing alcohol and CO2, there are also some unwanted byproducts being produced. After the sugars are gone, the yeast will consume the byproducts as well. This is what we mean by the yeast "cleaning up after themselves". It just refers to the fact that even though primary fermentation is complete, the yeast still are working at making your beer even tastier.

Even though there is not a set timetable, I think it's reasonable to say that most beers are ready for bottling or kegging after about 3 weeks in the primary. Always verify things with your hydrometer, though.
 
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KLAAYHAUS

KLAAYHAUS

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Thanks for the advice, it was determined that my FG was 1.02, so it sounds like it will be alright. I did learn a lesson about patience though! Thanks for the reccomended reading!
 

Noontime

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The airlock is a good indicator for an active fermentation, but not for when fermentation is finished. This is because your wort holds some of the CO2 in solution, becoming nearly saturated before releasing it and creating preasure that eventually pushes up through the airlock. At the tail end of fermentation much less CO2 is being produced, so small influences may affect the preasure like vibration or barometric preasure. Also, if you rack to secondary you release most of that CO2 that was suspended, so now the wort will be holding the CO2 being produced by the yeast and you won't see any activity in the airlock (even though fermentation is still going on).
 
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KLAAYHAUS

KLAAYHAUS

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Makes perfect sense, I am just relieved that my first brew should turn out. Possibly a little less ABV than expected, but next time I won't rush the racking process. Next time I may not even rack providing that I don't transfer all the trube from my boil kettle like I did this time.
 
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