Did Heat Kill My Babies?

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raceskier

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While it seems like everyone else has been fretting over the effect of frost on their hop babies, I'm wondering if high temps killed some of mine. I planted 6 rhizomes three weeks ago. The Cascade, Crystal, Goldings and Willamette are flourishing nicely. The Hallertau and Fuggles both put up one tiny shoot each, that both proceeded to wither and die back. We had a two periods of high temps here, 80's and even 90's. (Sometimes, we get mid summer temps in April in Socal.) I see from the descriptions of Fuggles and Hallertau that both "suffer a little in hot climates". Anyone else growing these where they get a warm start to the growing season?
 

scinerd3000

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im growing in socal also and i just planted mt hood and cascade however they havent come up yet. I know i planted late in the season but how long did it take until yours came up? I may have also planted them to deep. Ive been reading that your supposed to plant 1-2 inches below the surface and i did like 4....

I hope your wrong about the heat though....good luck
 

TwoHeadsBrewing

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Ah, Manhattan Beach...my sister lives there a few blocks from the ocean. Anyways, we've had some hot spells up here in Norcal as well but my hops seem to be thriving. I know Sierra Nevada has their own hop field, and they don't harvest until late summer....meaning that those plants are bearing over 100 degree heat. However, I'm not sure about the tolerance of your varieties. The SN hop field has Chinook, Centennials, and Cascades...which is exactly what I have growing.
 

Blender

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You might try shading them for coolness and keeping the soil moist and see if they come back.
 

rcb

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I've been growing 2 fuggles, and EKG, and a Willamette. I'm in southeast PA, but we have had quite a few 80 and 90+ days here. 1 of the fuggles is doing great. It was from last year, it is at least 3 ft. tall if not bigger. My EKG, Willamette, and other a Fuggles are from this year. They started in pots and i moved them to their new homes a few weeks ago. The EKG and Willamette were doing great but no sign of the other Fuggle. Finally today is see growth from it. So be patient, and hope for the best. I know it's easier said than done. From last year only that one fuggles grew so I Know how hard it is, but it's worth it. :off:What do people think of Fuggles as the name for a dog?
 

david_42

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I doubt it was the heat. 100F+ temperatures are normal in all three major hop regions of the US. After the Cascades, my Fuggles is the best producer and I see 100+ frequently. Either they dried out or you have a root rot.
 
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raceskier

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I went to dig up the Hallertau and Fuggles yesterday to replace them with a Chinook and a Horizon I picked up at the LHBS, and what do you know, they're not dead. Both had tiny shoots and leaves. On both plants, the leaves were tiny, maybe 1/4 inch. Both leaves had a greyish-brown discoloration at the tip of the leaf. I've read here that this could be over or under fertilization. I planted all of my hops identically in a mixture of potting soil, composted greens and steer manure. As mentioned before, most are flourishing. The guy at the LHBS mentioned that a lot of the European mild climate hops do not do well locally. I'm going to try and nurture these and see if I can get them to survive. I got a break, in that the weather is a bit milder now, in the high 60's.
 

morrighu

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If you didn't compost the cow manure first, it's probably much too rich in nitrogen and that's what's causing the leaf burn that you're seeing. All you can do now is wait for it to decompose on it's own and make sure you water thoroughly every time you water. That will help to dilute it and wash some of it away.

HTH,

M.
 
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