Did Budweiser get it wrong or did I miss something?

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Sharkeydude

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I had a web ad pop up today that stated "Raise one for the repeal of Prohibition April 7" from Budweiser. Have I missed something? It's my understanding that the 18th was repealed on Dec 5, 1933. Did Bud really get this wrong? I can't imagine the largest brewer in the world would screw this one up. Please enlighten me.
 
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How do you know it was actually from budweiser. It's a freakin pop up.

And I have no idea about the date being right or wrong. Try googling it.
 
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Sharkeydude

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I saw it on Yahoo. Look under the "Stolen Plane From Canada" story. It was not a pop up (sorry, used wrong terminology) it was a static, roll over ad.
 

flyangler18

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Budweiser Toasts its History With Repeal of Prohibition Commemoration - BeerAdvocate

On the night of April 6, 1933, more than 25,000 St. Louisans, representing the hopes and dreams of American workers, long since home from the war and demoralized by the Great Depression, gathered with eager hearts and tin cups in hand to once again sip the bittersweet nectar of Budweiser, a sensation unknown to them for 14 years.

As the clock atop the brewhouse showed one minute past midnight on April 7, 1933, sirens and steam whistles sounded, the large wooden doors of the brewery's Bevo bottling plant opened to the cheers of the thirsty, and 55 trucks laden with America's favorite brew rolled out into the night, delivering the first cases of post-Prohibition Budweiser to the masses.
http://www.anheuser-busch.com/Press/Prohibition.html
 

ewbish

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Interesting........I was always under the impression that Budweiser was one of the few breweries that stayed in business during the depression by using a recipe that brought it in under the legal ABV max for a beer.
 
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Sharkeydude

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Thanks flyangler18, I learned something today. Now I can have TWO Prohibition parties every year!
 

Boerderij_Kabouter

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Bud did stay in business but not selling beer.

As Prohibition became increasingly unpopular, especially in the big cities, "Repeal" was eagerly anticipated. On March 23, 1933, President Franklin Roosevelt signed into law an amendment to the Volstead Act known as the Cullen-Harrison Act, allowing the manufacture and sale of "3.2 beer" (3.2% alcohol by weight, approximately 4% alcohol by volume) and light wines. The original Volstead Act had defined "intoxicating beverage" as one with greater than 0.5% alcohol.[1] Upon signing the amendment, Roosevelt made his famous remark; "I think this would be a good time for a beer." The Eighteenth Amendment was repealed later in 1933 with ratification of the Twenty-first Amendment, on December 5.

The Twenty-first Amendment explicitly gives states the right to restrict or ban the purchase or sale of alcohol; this has led to a patchwork of laws, in which alcohol may be legally sold in some but not all towns or counties within a particular state. After the repeal of the national constitutional amendment, some states continued to enforce prohibition laws. Mississippi, which had made alcohol illegal in 1907, was the last state to repeal Prohibition, in 1966. Kansas did not allow sale of liquor "by the drink" (on-premises) until 1987. There are numerous "dry" counties or towns where no liquor is sold, even though liquor can often be brought in for private consumption.
 

ewbish

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Bud did stay in business but not selling beer.
Actually, they did stay in business brewing a .5 beer that came in under the limit set by Volstead Act. I read it in an article about the company's history, but it's also in the Bud Wiki:

"Budweiser is brewed using barley malt, water, hops and yeast. It is lagered with beechwood chips in the aging vessel which, according to Budweiser, creates a smoother taste. Rice will produce a "clean finish." Anheuser-Busch was also one of the few breweries during Prohibition that had the resources and wherewithal to convert to "cereal beer" production -- malt beverage made with non-fermentables such as rice and unmalted barley and rye, and able to stay under the 0.5% limit established by the Volstead Act. Following the repeal of Prohibition in 1933, the major breweries continued to use unmalted cereal grains to provide the full body and mouthfeel of a "real" beer while keeping the alcohol content low."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budweiser_(Anheuser-Busch)
 
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