Dextrin vs Carapils

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redrocker652002

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Are they basically the same? Reason I ask is I am thinking of doing a recipe that calls for a half pound of Dextrin malt and I have a half pound of Carapils on hand. Looking at MoreBeer, they seem to be interchangable, but wanted to see what the experts say. Also, I have not vacuum sealed my left over grains, but simply folded the bag they came in and used a clip to hold the bag closed. Would this affect the grain in any way? If the grain goes stale, then I will toss it and start from new. I only have about 6 ounces of 20l and 40l, and the carapils, so it is not a huge loss.

Thanks for looking and any replies.
 

AlexKay

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I believe Carapils is Briess’s trademark for dextrin malt. And honestly, you could probably leave it out completely and not notice the difference.

Folding over and clipped bags should be just fine, for a month or two for pre-crushed malt, and much longer for whole.
 

Dland

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I'd use up what you have on hand, good not to waste good ingredients, and always good to rotate stock.

Carapils might not be exactly the same as dextrin, but both add body, stability and some head retention.

If you can, grains should be stored in container that keeps moisture out. Lower and stable temp is a big plus also.

Taste the grain, if it tastes stale, don't waste a brew day, if it tastes OK, then beer will likely be fine.
 

AlexKay

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Tasting the grain is a great idea. Always do it (though sparingly for roast, and not at all for oat malt) so you learn what they taste like. Great for recipe planning, as well as checking ingredient quality.
 
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