Deer Season 2009

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HoppyDaze

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Well I finally tagged a big Mule Deer...Its been tough in Oregon. When I lived in Montana it was a bit easier. Here he is:



Anyone else have any luck this year?
 

Bernie Brewer

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I'm not a bowhunter, and gun deer doesn't start until Thanksgiving week in WI, so no deer picks yet. Pheasant opens Saturday, though. Want pics of a rooster if I drop one?:)
 

fifelee

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Nice muley. Where in MT were you from?


Thought you guys would enjoy this. My Uncle comes up from California every year to hunt birds/ducks. This year he drew an antelope tag. Walked by his Lexus today and this is what I saw. Must be the first time in all of history that a speedgoat head was left on a Lexus.

 

Ashz

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Couldn't resist posting this. Found this one night on the tubes.


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Roping A Deer

(Names have been removed to protect the stupid)

Actual letter from someone who farms and writes well:



I had this idea that I was going to rope a deer, put it in a stall, feed it up on corn for a couple of weeks, then kill it and eat it.

The first step in this adventure was getting a deer. I figured that, since they congregate at my cattle feeder and do not seem to have much fear of me when we are there (a bold one will sometimes come right up and sniff at the bags of feed while I am in the back of the truck not 4 feet away), it should not be difficult to rope one, get up to it and toss a bag over its head (to calm it down) then hog tie it and transport it home.

I filled the cattle feeder then hid down at the end with my rope.

The cattle, having seen the roping thing before, stayed well back.

They were not having any of it. After about 20 minutes, my deer showed up -- 3 of them. I picked out a likely looking one, stepped out from the end of the feeder, and threw my rope.

The deer just stood there and stared at me.

I wrapped the rope around my waist and twisted the end so I would have a good hold. The deer still just stood and stared at me, but you could tell it was mildly concerned about the whole rope situation.

I took a step towards it. It took a step away. I put a little tension on the rope and then received an education. The first thing that I learned is that, while a deer may just stand there looking at you funny while you rope it, they are spurred to action when you start pulling on that rope.

That deer EXPLODED!

The second thing I learned is that pound for pound, a deer is a LOT stronger than a cow or a colt. A cow or a colt in that weight range I could fight down with a rope and with some dignity.

A deer? No chance.

That thing ran and bucked and twisted and pulled. There was no controlling it and certainly no getting close to it. As it jerked me off my feet and started dragging me across the ground, it occurred to me that having a deer on a rope was not nearly as good an idea as I had originally imagined. The only up side is that they do not have as much stamina as many other animals.

A brief 10 minutes later, it was tired and not nearly as quick to jerk me off my feet and drag me when I managed to get up. It took me a few minutes to realize this, since I was mostly blinded by the blood flowing out of the big gash in my head. At that point, I had lost my taste for corn-fed venison. I just wanted to get that devil creature off the end of that rope.

I figured if I just let it go with the rope hanging around its neck, it would likely die slow and painfully somewhere. At the time, there was no love at all between me and that deer. At that moment, I hated the thing, and I would venture a guess that the feeling was mutual.

Despite the gash in my head and the several large knots where I had cleverly arrested the deer's momentum by bracing my head against various large rocks as it dragged me across the ground, I could still think clearly enough to recognize that there was a small chance that I shared some tiny amount of responsibility for the situation we were in, so I didn't want the deer to have to suffer a slow death, so I managed to get it lined back up in between my truck and the feeder -- a little trap I had set before hand...kind of like a squeeze chute. I got it to back in there and I started moving up so I could get my rope back.

Did you know that deer bite? They do! I never in a million years would have thought that a deer would bite somebody, so I was very surprised when I reached up there to grab that rope and the deer grabbed hold of my wrist.

Now, when a deer bites you, it is not like being bit by a horse where they just bite you and then let go. A deer bites you and shakes its head --almost like a mad dog. They bite HARD and it hurts.

The proper thing to do when a deer bites you is probably to freeze and draw back slowly. I tried screaming and shaking instead. My method was ineffective. It seems like the deer was biting and shaking for several minutes, but it was likely only several seconds.

I, being smarter than a deer (though you may be questioning that claim by now), tricked it. While I kept it busy tearing the tendons out of my right arm, I reached up with my left hand and pulled that rope loose. That was when I got my final lesson in deer behavior for the day.

Deer will strike at you with their front feet. They rear right up on their back feet and strike right about head and shoulder level, and their hooves are surprisingly sharp. I learned a long time ago that, when an animal -- like a horse --strikes at you with their hooves and you can't get away easily, the best thing to do is try to make a loud noise and make an aggressive move towards the animal. This will usually cause them to back down a bit so you can escape.

This was not a horse. This was a deer, so obviously, such trickery would not work. In the course of a millisecond, I devised a different strategy.

I screamed like a woman and tried to turn and run.

The reason I had always been told NOT to try to turn and run from a horse that paws at you is that there is a good chance that it will hit you in the back of the head. Deer may not be so different from horses after all, besides being twice as strong and 3 times as evil, because the second I turned to run, it hit me right in the back of the head and knocked me down.

Now, when a deer paws at you and knocks you down, it does not immediately leave. I suspect it does not recognize that the danger has passed. What they do instead is paw your back and jump up and down on you while you are laying there crying like a little girl and covering your head.

I finally managed to crawl under the truck and the deer went away. So now I know why when people go deer hunting they bring a rifle with a scope to sort of even the odds.
 

nealf

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I got one this past weekend with my Jetta! I believe it was a lady deer, are those in season yet?
 

Thumper

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Thanks for posting that Ashz. I got a good laugh out of that.
 

david_42

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Saw two does last night while coming up my driveway. First deer I've seen this year on the property. I think it's going to take 3-4 years for the population to recover from the scruffy coat disease.
 

oldschool

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Since early archery season came in, my brewing has been put on hold since 10/1. I hope to have gotten my tags filled by thanksgiving so i can resume brewing. ~its a hard life~
 

Airborneguy

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Heading out a in a few hours for my first day of the season. Still archery around here. Haven't had much time lately and I don't anticipate this being as much of a season as I have had the last few years but I'll make the best of whatever days I get! Good luck everyone!!
 

Mutilated1

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I was on a big buck yesterday evening for a couple of exciting hours, but I didn't even get a shot.

My plan was to get downwind of a food plot where I see deer on game camera about dusk, but as I was walking in I stopped to freshen a scrape that my son and I had made the day before. Well when I got to the scrape, the buck had decided to make another scrape right next to it, so I decided to hunt over that scrape and see if he would stop and check it on his way to the food plots. So I put out my scents and foud a comfortable spot to sit down and hide and after a few minutes this squirell spotted me and started scolding me from this white oak tree so I had to move, then a couple hours later I heard the deer down the hill but I couldn't see him. Finally he cut back in the other direction and with the sun going down his antlers were shining bright in the last of the days sun, if it were rifle season I would have got him for sure but I just sat still and watched him for 20 minutes hoping he would decide to come and check that scrape. Eventually he disappeared and I figured I could either sit there till dark and hope the big buck tried to check the scrape or I could try to walk parallel with where he was moving and see if I could catch him in a crossing somewhere.

So I hurried down hill and found a downed tree to hide behind where I could see the logging road at my back and across some shooting lanes I had previously cut through the creek bottom and laid in wait for another hour.

About dark I saw him again, he was further down the creek bottom than I was, somehow he managed to sneak past me.

By then it was too dark to shoot and I didn't want to spook the deer off my food plot, but I was so close I couldn't resist walking another quarter mile to take a a look -- I could see several deer bodies in the dark but shooting deer by moonlight isn't fair chase so I watched till it got around 7:30 and I had a half hour hike to where my ride was coming to pick me up and I left.

I've seen deer every day but one that I've been out, and I hunt 2-3 times a week during the week and all day Saturday and Sunday. Haven't taken a shot yet this season even though I've seen a lot.
 

Six_O_Turbo

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Thats, a nice buck. Probably one of the best I've seen this year. I did hear of a couple of huge bucks (180-200 class) that were chased off private property and shot in the same area I got mine a few days after I left. I only saw 2 other bucks before I finally shot my smallish buck.

Don't have a pic of this years uploaded yet, but previous years....
 

Mutilated1

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Hunted the last day of regular bow season today, got in the blind overlooking the food plot about two hours before dusk, right about 10 minutes before dark my daughter started with the "Daddy, I gotta go - its an emergency" so we packed it up and hiked a mile back to the car in about 15 minutes. Missed the end of the bow season and didn't get one, but the muzzleloading season starts tomorrow so I'm sure I will get one one this week, I've been out before dawn plenty of days and seen lots of deer just couldn't get in bow range, but with my 50 cal Knight Bighorn I can nail one out to 200 yards.

Want to kill one with my muzzleloader next week, and then I'm going to the hunting club weekend after next to fill all but one of my buck tags, then I'm going to go back to bowhunting till the end of January - Saving a buck tag to take one with a bow if I can pull it off.
 
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