Dead yeast in priming bottles, can I introduce new yeast?

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Leo

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I think I may have oversanitized my bottles, Almost no sediment/ carbonation after a week and half in ideal conditions. For reference, I made a Pils at 4.7% which fermented normally, I primed with 3/4 cup Sugar for a 5 gallon batch netting 55 bottles.

My plan to fix this is to mix a new packet of yeast with warm water, a bit of sugar and yeast nutrient to make a 55ml solution, uncap each bottle, add 1ml and re-cap. The one thing I'm concerned about is that it would be a different strain of yeast, I used S-05 to ferment but I only have S-04 packets left. If anyone can think of a reason why this wouldn't work please let me know.
 

RPh_Guy

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Your plan sounds reasonable. Using S-04 is fine because it wouldn't eat any sugars that US-05 would normally leave behind.

A couple things though:
Bottles cannot be "oversanitized".
What does "ideal conditions" mean to you?
More details would be really useful for trying to help. (How long was the beer in primary fermenter? Did you use a secondary vessel? Did you "cold crash" or otherwise chill the beer before botting? How exactly did you add the priming sugar? How exactly did you sanitize the bottles? At what temperature are you storing the bottles? Have you used this process successfully in the past?)

I have some bottling tips here, to not only prevent oxidation but also to help carbonate very quickly:
https://modernbrewhouse.com/wiki/Low_oxygen_brewing#Bottling

Cheers
 

dwhite60

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How long has it been in the bottle?
What temperature have they been kept at?
Did you happen to do some type of extended cold crash?

Are you sure you added your priming sugar? I've seen it happen.
You're sure you got it stirred in adequately?

I just bottled some I made with Coopers dry yeast. I'm surprised how little sediment is in the bottles. You're SURE there is no sediment?
 

MikeCo

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A week and a half is not very long. I would give it a full 3 weeks and then open one to see if it's carbonated. Temperature is important too. If possible put the bottles in a warm place, above 70F.

I agree, you can't over-sanitize bottles unless maybe you leave pourable quantities of sanitizer in them. If the beer aged a long time or was lagered or cold-crashed, there will be less active yeast left in suspension and carbonating will take longer.

Bottle conditioning times in my experience are quite variable. Some beers I have bottled take less than 10 days to be fully carbonated, while others have taken 6 weeks. Patience is required. The only beers I bottle anymore are Belgian styles and now I always add fresh yeast at bottling to help the process along, since usually they are higher ABV and have aged several weeks before bottling.
 

ncbrewer

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My plan to fix this is to mix a new packet of yeast with warm water, a bit of sugar and yeast nutrient to make a 55ml solution, uncap each bottle, add 1ml and re-cap.
The possibility of bottle bombs would make me err on the side of caution. Adding more sugar could be a problem.
 
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