Danstar Nottingham pitching..

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mandal

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Hi,

I am not going to re-hydrate my nottingham yeast this time since it is my first home brew..

So my Question is:

I am brewing my first home brew today so i was wondering, what temperature it is best to pitch Nottingham dry yeast into the wort?

And what air temperature should i put my fermenting bucket in?

I have read that it can get a taste of banana if the temperature is to high.

Thanks:)
 

Yooper

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Nottingham works from about 59 degrees F to 72 degrees F. For best results, I like to keep the fermenter temperature no higher than about 65 degrees. I have a stick-on thermometer on the side of the fermenter, to monitor the temperature inside. The air temperature may be quite a bit different than the temperature inside, because fermentation produces heat. If you can keep the air temperature at 62-65 degrees, though, that will be pretty good.
 

Cpt_Kirks

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I have found Notty to be bad to produce fusels at high fermentation temps. You should probably keep it in the low 60's to avoid the off flavors and headaches.
 
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mandal

mandal

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So i would be best to pitch the yeast on the wort at 62-64 degrees F?
And keep the air temperature where i store my fermenter at the same temperature?
 

conpewter

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So i would be best to pitch the yeast on the wort at 62-64 degrees F?
And keep the air temperature where i store my fermenter at the same temperature?

It is best to pitch in the range you mentioned, and keep the beer at that temp as it ferments. If you keep the air at that temp the beer could be up to 10 degrees higher when it is fermenting.

If you put the carboy into a large tub and monitor the temp of that water you can add frozen bottles of water to keep the temp in check.
 
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mandal

mandal

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I dont have that opportunity here in my appartment, what will happend if i put the fermenter in 62-64 F ?

And how long should i let the fermenter stay in that temprature before i bottle the beer?
 

jbambuti

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There's nothing difficult to rehydrating. You just need to use 2 cups of water to 1 pack of notty. Use a thermometer to make sure your water is in the 85-95 degree range, sprinkle the packet on top of the water, don't stir, wait 15 minutes with the solution covered, stir up the yeast and pitch. You'll ensure better yeast viability that way, especially if you're doing a higher gravity brew.
 

conpewter

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I dont have that opportunity here in my appartment, what will happend if i put the fermenter in 62-64 F ?

And how long should i let the fermenter stay in that temprature before i bottle the beer?
You'll be fine, you may get some slight esters from nottingham if it gets too high, but most people just ferment at room temp and it turns out pretty good.

Just let it sit for 3 weeks at that temp, then carefully siphon into your bottling bucket (with priming sugar) and bottle. The extra time on the yeast cake lets the yeast clean up a bit of the esters. I do all my beers at 3 weeks or more in the fermenter.
 
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mandal

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I am brewing a muntons continental pilsner 3 kg, i was told that this kit should be good for a newbee..

What temperature should i ferment my bottles in ? Is it ok to ferment at 70 degrees F after i have bottle?
 

conpewter

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yes you should condition bottles at 70 degrees. There's much less actual fermentation happening during bottle conditioning.
 
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mandal

mandal

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I have one more Question regarding nottingham pitching, since i am not rehyrating the yeast this time, should i use 2 pk (11 gram) of nottingham when i pitch the yeast at 62-64 *F or is it enough with 1 pk on 22-23 liter wort?
 

khiddy

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One package is certainly enough.

And then stand back. In my experience, Notty is explosive! Two fermenter lids of mine have lived to tell the tale. Put your fermenter in a restaurant bus tub if you can, because it WILL overflow, even at 62-65 degrees.

Rest assured, the beer produced thereby tastes delicious.
 

2bluewagons

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It sounds like you may be misunderstanding the process of re-hydrating the yeast. All you do is put the dry yeast from the package into some warm water (30-33 degree C) for 15 minutes before pitching it.

If you don't rehydrate, you kill up to half of the yeast when their cell walls are overwhelmed by the osmotic pressure of the wort. That's not very nice to the yeasties...
 

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When I hydrate my dry yeast, I boil some water before I start brewing, I cover it and let it sit while I am boiling.After about a half hour it is cool enough to add the yeast, Then by the time I need it it is ready to go. My last half dozen batches or so I have just poured it in dry and it seems to work just as well.
 

conpewter

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Remember if you are hydrating the yeast to follow the procedures for that strain. Each strain has an optimum hydration temp, usually between 95 and 105 *F. Also you need to cool the hydrated yeast down to within 15* of the wort temperature before pitching them. This should all be done within 30 minutes of starting the hydration process. This can be done by a cool water bath or by adding small amounts of your wort to the hydrated yeast to slowly even out the temp.
 

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Remember if you are hydrating the yeast to follow the procedures for that strain. Each strain has an optimum hydration temp, usually between 95 and 105 *F. Also you need to cool the hydrated yeast down to within 15* of the wort temperature before pitching them. This should all be done within 30 minutes of starting the hydration process. This can be done by a cool water bath or by adding small amounts of your wort to the hydrated yeast to slowly even out the temp.
My yeast packet suggested to rehydrate by tempering but the kit instructions said not to do it. My wife is a very accomplished baker and she said to follow the yeast packet instructions and not the kit instructions. I was too scared I would kill the yeast by tempering so I just sprinkled it over the wort. Next time I'm going to temper it to see if there's a difference.
 
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mandal

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I was wondering what kind of OG i will get on muntons continental pilsner 3 Kilogram and 0,5 Kilogram with a total volum of 23 Liters.

What kind og Alcohol % will i get with this volum and these ingrediens`?
 

SmugMug

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I was wondering what kind of OG i will get on muntons continental pilsner 3 Kilogram and 0,5 Kilogram with a total volum of 23 Liters.

What kind og Alcohol % will i get with this volum and these ingrediens`?
I'm not sure. But I'll be happy to get you some spell check software. :D
 

jds

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I never make a starter with quality dry yeast. The cell count is high enough with a quality package of dry yeast that starters are, at best, ineffective. Danstar also claims (in their tech. data sheets) that aeration is also not necessary, due to high sterol levels in the dry yeast, but I still aerate my wort anyhow.
 

bull8042

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I rehydrated two packs of Notty yesterday together and pitched into two 5gal batches of Biermuncher's Cream of Three Crops. Fermentation started within a few hours and they were both blowing off like crazy tonight. Rehydrate your dry yeast and they will work hard for you......
 
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