Dank Hop Schedule Help

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum:

rodwha

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2011
Messages
4,995
Reaction score
297
Location
Lakeway
The recipe is for a black IPA and I was given the advice to pair Simcoe and Chinook with what would have been an all Columbus IPA. I have 2 packs of Columbus that are each 2 oz and a single oz of the other two hops.

The way I really have liked to do my IPAs is to use a small amount for bittering (15-20 IBUs), and do a standard 15 and 5 min addition, along with a whirlpool that shoots for 90+ IBUs. And then a good size dry hop. I’m figuring I’ll be using a 2 oz pack of Columbus and both oz of the others.

It seems that both the Simcoe and Chinook would be best at 5 mins, maybe the whirlpool?, and the dry hop. How would you divvy up the hops to achieve a nice dankness?
 

Kickass

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2009
Messages
1,199
Reaction score
846
Location
Tehachapi
What volume are you brewing? Is it safe to assume something less than 5 gallons since you have 6 oz’s of hops to work with?
 

hottpeper13

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2013
Messages
1,644
Reaction score
756
Location
Mequon
Everybody has different opinions on this but I like mine to be more towards west coast hop schedules. I would do CTZ at 60 for 1/2 the bittering charge, Chinook at 30- 1/4 charge and Simcoe at flameout for the rest with a 10-20 min whirlpool. I like Chinook for the dry hop.
 
OP
OP
rodwha

rodwha

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2011
Messages
4,995
Reaction score
297
Location
Lakeway
Everybody has different opinions on this but I like mine to be more towards west coast hop schedules. I would do CTZ at 60 for 1/2 the bittering charge, Chinook at 30- 1/4 charge and Simcoe at flameout for the rest with a 10-20 min whirlpool. I like Chinook for the dry hop.
I love a ton of the west coast IPAs I’ve had. Just got back from a trip to CA and back, a 17 day trip that netted a ton of beer to bring back.

Close to ten years ago or so I was struggling in pursuit of making mine taste like that despite shooting for the high end of the IBU range. Ultimately I’ve cut my bittering down to just enough to take the sweet edge off (10-20 IBUs), use it as a first wort hop, and load up on a 15 min, a 5 min, and a whirlpool followed by a dry hop. And I shoot for 90+ IBUs if I can.

I created a quick simple recipe to showcase what my hopping schedule would have looked like using the 4 oz of Columbus (12.2% AA) I got in a 2.5 gal batch:

5 lbs 2-row
0.5 lb crystal 60
0.125 oz @ FWH (15 IBUs)
.9375 oz @ 15 min (28) and 5 min (17)
1 oz @ 185° WP for 30 min (37)
US-05

6.4% and 97 IBUs

Now this only left me with 1 oz for dry hopping so I’d have ordered another ounce feeling like that would me minimal for an IPA. It’s a little harder working in smaller increments and I just don’t care whole lot for opened packages in the freezer waiting any longer. Seeing what I see now I’d order a 1/2 oz of Cascade and use 1/2 of that for bittering.

I have on my list of things to do eventually is go back to a more traditional, but on the lighter side still, bittering addition.

I am contemplating trying out the vacuum sealer to see how well hops last once opened, and I’ve wondered if it can reseal the original packaging. I’d hate to ruin my vacuum sealer though… Until then I intend to make 4-4.5 oz work for an IPA, and would love to hear how you’d do it differently and why.
 

marc1

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jun 19, 2010
Messages
1,690
Reaction score
1,279
Location
OH
I am contemplating trying out the vacuum sealer to see how well hops last once opened, and I’ve wondered if it can reseal the original packaging. I’d hate to ruin my vacuum sealer though… Until then I intend to make 4-4.5 oz work for an IPA, and would love to hear how you’d do it differently and why.
Hops last great vacuum sealed in the deep freezer. After opening, I leave the remainder in the original packaging and then seal the whole thing in a big bag. The plastic can be reused if you leave extra room and only cut off a bit at each opening.

Buying by the pound can save a lot of money
 
Top