cutting the keg dip tube

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so i know all about trimming the dip tube on a corny keg so that you dont get yeast, but are there any other options? like filters? i was thinking a copper pot scrubber, maybe? anyone try any thing like that. it's not that i'm concerned that i'm leaving behind 2.53oz of beer, but that even though i've trimmed the tube, disturbing the keg might still cause junk in my beer. also strongly considering investing in a filtering setup, but my beer clears up well enough. anyone care to share there experiences with serving from a keg and what sort of haze they get from yeast settling on the bottom.
 

denimglen

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I'm pretty new to kegging but haven't had any yeast problems so far.

If anything I'd say leave the dip tube full length, let the yeast settle, and then just pull a glass and you'll probably get it all out.
 

Brewing Clamper

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It really depends on how badly you want your beer to be clear. I've tried the filter thing... once. It was a PITA that just wasn't worth it to me. I just give my beers a nice 2-4 week secondary then keg. The first pint or so may have some sediment, but the beer is mostly crystal clear.
 

david_42

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There are filter screens that go over the end of the tube, but they are not fine enough to block yeast. I have one on my fruit cider keg. It keeps seeds and skin bits out, but that's it. You need 0.65 micron or smaller to block yeast.
 

malkore

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Step 1: 2 week secondary
Step 2: force carb, don't prime the keg
Step 3: profit!...err, I mean, draw a few ounces of beer, and you're set.

I do the above, can transport my kegs for miles, and the first pour never has yeast in it.
 

mr x

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I just tapped a keg last week of Haus Pale Ale I made on September 1. The first pint was slightly cloudy, but not yeasty tasting. At about the 8th .4 litre mug, it is so crystal clear, it's awesome (I wish I had a picture to share, but my camera is at the other house). Looks like time is the best remedy.
 

robnog

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I have not tried this yet, but I was thinking about putting a racking cane tip on the end of my dip tube.
 

Bobby_M

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A racking tip would end up leaving a about a pint of beer behind. If you secondary, cold crashing it for a week prior to kegging will leave you with hardly any sediment in the keg.
 

Funkenjaeger

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If you want to experiment with having the dip tube raised up off the bottom a bit, don't go doing something crazy like cutting it - just bend it a bit. This also has the advantage of moving the tip away from the center, where most sediment will collect. Use your hands and bend it over your knee or something, just be gentle so it doesn't start to crimp. I have done this to all of my kegs, it takes just seconds to do. I only bent mine slightly, so I lose less than a pint of beer, but a lot of sediment gets left behind as a result, and it'd be very easy to bend it back if I ever changed my mind.
 
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