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MacGruber

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I would like some input/advice on my recipe. It's basic but I'm sure it could be tweaked or improved. I'm going for a breads/biscuity Octoberfest.

Style: Octoberfest
Batch size 5 gal.
OG 1.056
Fg 1.014
SRM 12.8

4 lbs Pale 2 row
5 lbs Maris Otter
1 lb Munich 10
1 lb Biscuit malt
1 lb Caramel 60

1oz Tettnang 60 min
0.5 oz Hallertauer 30 min
0.5 oz Hallertauer 5 min.

Whirlfloc at 15 min
Wyeast 2308 Munich Lager-2L starter

Ferment at 50-55 degrees for two weeks then drop to 42 degrees for one month.

Would you brew this? I'm thinking that maybe the Pale malt could be replaced with more Munich, but that could be too heavy. Thoughts?
 
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MacGruber

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Is Munich breadier than Maris Otter?
 

BeerLogic

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Most definitely. It's usually toasted to somewhere between 7L and 10L. Maris Otter is 4L to 5L.
 

BigEd

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I would like some input/advice on my recipe. It's basic but I'm sure it could be tweaked or improved. I'm going for a breads/biscuity Octoberfest.

Style: Octoberfest
Batch size 5 gal.
OG 1.056
Fg 1.014
SRM 12.8

4 lbs Pale 2 row
5 lbs Maris Otter
1 lb Munich 10
1 lb Biscuit malt
1 lb Caramel 60

1oz Tettnang 60 min
0.5 oz Hallertauer 30 min
0.5 oz Hallertauer 5 min.

Whirlfloc at 15 min
Wyeast 2308 Munich Lager-2L starter

Ferment at 50-55 degrees for two weeks then drop to 42 degrees for one month.

Would you brew this? I'm thinking that maybe the Pale malt could be replaced with more Munich, but that could be too heavy. Thoughts?
Two words: German malt. A preferred combination of Munich, Vienna and pils malts is what you want here. With that there is no need for Biscuit and I would eliminate or at least cut back the crystal malt. And if you are using crystal malt, again choose a German offering rather than domestic or UK. If you are looking for a more modern, lighter colored version (and it seems you are) try maybe 50% Vienna, 30% pils and 20% Munich. I would also drop the late hop addition. :mug:

Here's a starting point:

6# German Vienna
3# German pils
2.5# German Munich 10L
.5# CaraMunich I

1 oz Tett 4%AA @ 60 min
.5 oz Tett 4%AA @ 20 min
 
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MacGruber

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Awesome. I was thinking about the need for all German malts too. I didn't think my recipe made much sense with US and UK malts in their. I'll play around with some of these ideas. Keep them coming!
 

BeerLogic

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BigEd - That will, indeed, make a very nice Octoberfest, but will be more on the traditional side - probably not the sort of big breadiness the op is asking for. I like big, in-you-face breadiness in an Octoberfest, and most of the best ones I've had were 100% Munich.
 
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MacGruber

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So I've played with the numbers and malt ideas and I'm leaning towards

7 lbs Munich
2lbs Vienna
2 lbs Pils
1 lb biscuit (keeping it in there)
0.5 lb caramunich II (63 degrees L).

I've always wanted to try Vienna malt and never have. I've used Munich plenty of times and have liked the results. Whats the flavor profile of Vienna? Also, this will be my first Octoberfest. It's my favorite style and I've been brewing for about three years. I decided it's time to try to make one.
 

BigEd

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BigEd - That will, indeed, make a very nice Octoberfest, but will be more on the traditional side - probably not the sort of big breadiness the op is asking for. I like big, in-you-face breadiness in an Octoberfest, and most of the best ones I've had were 100% Munich.
Frankly I've seen the "breadiness" term used a lot lately re Oktoberfests and I really don't get it. To me Oktoberfests aren't 'bready" at all. IMO German higher-kilned malts like Vienna and Munich aren't bready in the sense that some UK products are they are rich, slightly toasty and malty-sweet (not to be confused with sugar-sweet or crystal malt sweet). Some UK malts and beers can be accurately described as bready, especially in combination with the lingering yeasty profiles of many of the UK strains.

I too prefer larger quantities of dark Munich malt in an Oktoberfest to yield a deep, copper color and rich flavor. :mug:
 
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