Critique? Belgian Saison Partial Mash

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Tundrabrewing

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Trying to keep as close to the style as possible. Added a little acidulated malt for flavor rather than PH.

I have been using Deathbrewers stovetop partial mash method. Mash at 155 for 45 min. Sparge at 170 for 20. This gave me a 75% efficiency last time, but set this up at 70 for good luck. Any thoughts?

Belgian Saison

34% 3lb 3oz Pilsner Liquid Extract
32% 3lb 0oz Pilsner (2 Row) Ger
21% 2lb 0oz Munich Malt - 10L
5% 0lb 8oz Belgian Candy Sugar Amber
5% 0lb 8oz Caramel Wheat Malt
3% 0lb 4oz Acidulated Malt


hops
boil 60 mins 2.0oz Hallertau info
boil 20 mins 1.0oz Select Spalt
boil 5 mins 0.75oz Styrian Goldings
boil 5 min 1/2tsp Cardamom Seed
boil 5 min 1 Tbsp Coriander Seed

Boil: 4.0 avg gallons for 60 minutes


yeast Wyyeast 3724 Belgian Saison
ale yeast in liquid form with low flocculation

Batch size: 5.0 gallons
Original Gravity 1.056
Final Gravity 1.012
Color 11° SRM / 21° EBC (Copper to Red/Lt. Brown)
Mash Efficiency 70%
Alcohol 5.9% A.B.V.
Bitterness 29.7 IBU
 

Grizzlybrew

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My only advice would be to mash at 146-149. Saisons are meant to be bone dry. 155 is going to leave you with too much sweetness - plus, you're already battling the "mash temperature" of the extract.
 
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Tundrabrewing

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That's good to know, of all the reading I did I was unable to find anything specific on the mashing temperature. I will definately note that when I do it.
 

skeeordye11

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Why the Munich malt? Personally I don't think fits into the Saison style. I would just use more base malt instead of the munich. Also, the 3724 yeast can stall out and then restart and finish. I would recommend keeping it warm in the 80-85 degree range. I have done this with this yeast a couple of times with good success. That's my $.02. Cheers!
 

blizzard

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You can supposedly "mash" the extract to make it more fermentable. I haven't tried it and honestly don't really understand how it works, but apparently there is a Jamil show (about Saisons) that talks about it.
 
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Tundrabrewing

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The BJCP style guidelines for Saison state:

Ingredients: Pilsner malt dominates the grist though a portion of Vienna and/or Munich malt contributes color and complexity. Adjuncts such as candi sugar and honey can also serve to add complexity and thin the body. Hop bitterness and flavor may be more noticeable than in many other Belgian styles. A saison is sometimes dry-hopped. Noble hops, Styrian or East Kent Goldings are commonly used. A wide variety of herbs and spices are generally used to add complexity and uniqueness in the stronger versions. Varying degrees of acidity and/or sourness can be created by the use of gypsum, acidulated malt, a sour mash or Lactobacillus. Hard water, common to most of Wallonia, can accentuate the bitterness and dry finish.
 
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Tundrabrewing

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I will turn on a space heater to if I can increase the temperature of my fermentation room, and definately look into the mashing of the extract too!

Thanks guys!
 

Grizzlybrew

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You can supposedly "mash" the extract to make it more fermentable. I haven't tried it and honestly don't really understand how it works, but apparently there is a Jamil show (about Saisons) that talks about it.
That sounds pretty interesting. I'll be DLing the podcast shortly.

It reminded me that I saw some conversion enzyme for sale at the LHBS the other day. Although I can't find anything about it right now and didn't ask the owner.
 

kyleobie

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I agree on mashing low, you want a low FG in a saison. It's best as a dry style.

Caramel malts strike me as getting in the way of the dryness of the beer, and adding unnecessary body, but others might disagree. I didn't use any crystal malts in my saison last year.

Otherwise looks OK to me.
 

BeerAtlas

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I would definitely agree with the ferm temp. I even ferment mine up to 90-95...gives great spice/pepper/phenols. You almost can't ferment this too hot.
 
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Tundrabrewing

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Caramel malts strike me as getting in the way of the dryness of the beer, and adding unnecessary body, but others might disagree. I didn't use any crystal malts in my saison last year.
I actually forgot to order the Carawheat malt. So I omited it and used 1lb of belgian candy sugar instead. helped keep the SRM where it should be and lowered my FG. I will brew it again WITH the Carawheat and see which I like better.
 
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